Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic
Wednesday, July 2 • 09:30 - 10:55
Manhattan: End-User Programming for Music

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

Manhattan: End-User Programming for Music
Chris Nash
University of the West of England

Long Paper

This paper explores the concept of end-user programming languages in music composition, and introduces the Manhattan system, which integrates formulas with a grid-based style of music sequencer. Following the paradigm of spreadsheets, an established model of end-user programming, Manhattan is designed to bridge the gap between traditional music editing methods (such as MIDI sequencing and typesetting) and generative and algorithmic music – seeking both to reduce the learning threshold of programming and support flexible integration of static and dynamic musical elements in a single work. Interaction draws on rudimentary knowledge of mathematics and spreadsheets to augment the sequencer notation with programming concepts such as expressions, built-in functions, variables, pointers and arrays, iteration (for loops), branching (goto), and conditional statements (if-then-else). In contrast to other programming tools, formulas emphasise the visibility of musical data (e.g. notes), rather than code, but also allow composers to interact with notated music from a more abstract perspective of musical processes. To illustrate the function and use cases of the system, several examples of traditional and generative music are provided, the latter drawing on minimalism (process-based music) as an accessible introduction to algorithmic composition. Throughout, the system and approach are evaluated using the cognitive dimensions of notations framework, together with early feedback for use by artists.

Authors
CN

Chris Nash

Senior Lecturer in Music Technology, University of the West of England|Bristol||United Kingdom
Chris Nash is a professional programmer and composer, and currently Senior Lecturer in Music Technology (Soft ware Development for Audio, Sound, and Music) at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol, UK). He completed his PhD on music HCI at the University of Cambridge, looking at theoretical and analytical methods for modeling and designing interfaces for composition, supported by a longitudinal study of over 1,000 DAW users... Read More →


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:55
New Academic Building: LG02

Attendees (10)