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Monday, June 30
 

08:30

Conference REGISTRATION
Workshop registration will take place in the Richard Hoggart Building Foyer on Monday.

Registration will be open from 8.30am - 2.45pm. From 3pm registration will be in the New Academic Building Cafe are on the ground floor.

Monday June 30, 2014 08:30 - 14:45
Richard Hoggart Building Foyer

09:30

Interactive Music Notation & Representation
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://notation.afim-asso.org/doku.php/evenements/2014-06-30-nimew

Computer music tools for music notation have long been restricted to conventional approaches and dominated by a few systems, mainly oriented towards music engraving. During the last decade and driven by artistic and technological evolutions, new tools and new forms of music representation have emerged. The recent advent of systems like Bach, MaxScore or INScore (to cite just a few), clearly indicates that computer music notation tools have become mature enough to diverge from traditional approaches and to explore new domains and usages such as interactive and live notation.

The aim of the workshop is to gather artists, researchers and application developers, to compare the views and the needs inspired by contemporary practices, with a specific focus on interactive and live music, including representational forms emerging from live coding. Special consideration will be given to new instrumental forms emerging from the NIME community.


Monday June 30, 2014 09:30 - 13:00
Education Building: Room EB221 Goldsmiths campus

09:30

Practice-based Research and NIMEs.
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://www.creativityandcognition.com/NIMEWorkshop/

Practitioner-researchers in new musical instrument/interface design often set themselves multiple challenges: they seek to design and implement new technologies, create and perform new works, examine and evaluate what they have done and, finally, articulate what has been learned in the process.

To do this effectively requires careful consideration of the links between creative work and research.  Failing to do so can lead to technical research which lacks relevance to creative practice or, conversely, creative work where the broader contribution is unclear.

This workshop focuses on the relationships between creative practice and research – and blends of the two – with particular emphasis on new musical interface/instrument design.

Authors
AJ

Andrew Johnston

Andrew is a researcher, interaction/software designer and musician based at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). He has qualifications in music performance and computing and a PhD combining the two. As a musician he has performed professionally with several Australian symphony orchestras, musicals and a number of other ensembles. His practice and research focuses on the design of systems that support experimental, exploratory approaches... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 09:30 - 17:00
Education Building: Room EB220 Goldsmiths campus

10:00

A NIME Primer
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://www.kasrl.org/nime_primer_2014.pdf

A NIME Primer:
Michael Lyons, Ritsumeikan University Kyoto, Japan
Sidney Fells, University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada 
 
Attending NIME for the first time can be an overwhelming
experience. Beginners may find it difficult to make sense of
the vast array of topics presented during the busy program
of talks and posters, or appreciate the significance of the
wide variety of demos and concerts. This half-day tutorial
is intended to provide a general and gentle introduction to
the theory and practice of the design of interactive systems
for music creation and performance. Our target audience
consists of newcomers to the field who would like to start re-
search projects, as well as interested students, people from
other fields and members of the public with a general inter-
est in the potential of NIME. We aim to give our audience
an entry point to the theory and practice of musical inter-
face design by drawing on case studies from previous years
of the conference. Past attendees of the tutorial have told
us that they gained a helpful perspective that helped them
to increase their understanding and appreciation of their
first NIME.

Authors
Artists
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 10:00 - 13:00
Education Building: Room EB226 Goldsmiths campus

10:00

Human Harp
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://humanharp.org

The Human Harp is a project led by artist Di Mainstone
with hardware and software engineering by Becky Stewart
and Adam Stark. The project draws inspiration from sus-
pension bridges and explores how they can be transformed
into musical instruments through augmentation with phys-
ical computing interfaces.

The proposed workshop will lead participants through the
hardware and software central to the installation - in par-
ticular the hardware string interface and the sound gener-
ation software. Participants will get hands-on experience
programming and testing the Arduino-based hardware and
then a guided tour through the software generating the au-
dio.

Authors
DM

Di Mainstone

Artist, Human Harp
Artist in residence at Queen Mary University London, Di collaborates with researchers from the Centre for Digital Music and Media Arts and Technology group, to develop new musical instruments that are inspired by the body, transforming physical movement into sound via digital technology. Di has invented the term “Movician” to describe the player of these instruments - a hybrid artist who explores and composes sound through movement.


Monday June 30, 2014 10:00 - 13:00
Education Building: EB224 Goldsmiths campus

10:00

Learning to Programme Haptic Interactions
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/learning-to-program-haptic-interactions-using-max-applications-with-sound-tickets-11441165835

In this workshop, participants will learn how to program force-feedback haptic interactions in Max. During the workshop, each participant will borrow a FireFader haptic device with the option of purchasing it at the end of the workshop. This workshop aims to get participants easily up to speed by examining simple example haptic interactions in the familiar Max programming environment. Many of these examples are based on physical models and leverage Max’s palette of visualization objects to help communicate the means of operation to participants. More advanced examples help provide participants with specific insight into how haptics can be integrated into novel music compositions and sound art. Several music compositions will be used as examples: "Metronom," "Transmogrified Strings," "Engraving–Hammering–Casting," and "When The Robots Get Loose." 

Come support open-source software and open-source hardware!

Authors
avatar for Edgar Berdahl

Edgar Berdahl

Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University
avatar for Alexandros Kontogeorgakopoulos

Alexandros Kontogeorgakopoulos

Cardiff School of Art and Design
Dr Alexandros Kontogeorgakopoulos is a researcher in sound and music computing, a musician, and a sonic artist. He has studied physics, computer science, digital arts, classical music and computer music in Greece and in France. His research and musical interests are situated at the intersection of music, art, science and technology. He has published several articles in journals, international conferences, and participated in many workshops... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 10:00 - 13:00
Education Building: Room EB225 Goldsmiths campus

10:00

NIME & Accessibility
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://depic.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/accessnime/

We propose to bring together different communities, including the NIME community and the community centred around the AIMS (Accessible Interfaces for Music and Sound) group, to participate in a one day workshop at NIME 2014 to explore both the accessibility of NIMEs and what NIMEs can bring to accessible audio interfaces. This will take the shape of a day of demos of NIME-related technologies, presentations and sessions for learning and the exchange of skills and techniques surrounding accessibility and interactive music. The workshop aims to balance information exchange with practical hands on experiences, and will feature a 90 minute special session lead by Sile O’Modhrain on movement and interactivity, giving participants experience working with NIME-related technologies that they can extend into their own practices.


Monday June 30, 2014 10:00 - 17:00
GDS (Goldsmiths Digital Studios) Ben Pimlott Building, Goldsmiths campus

14:00

Keyboard Salon: Connecting Instrument Designers and Artistic Practitioners
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~andrewm/keyboard-workshop.html

Within the current conference format, there are two ways to
experience new interfaces—as a demo or in a concert perfor-
mance. Demo sessions display many projects concurrently,
with a focus on the technical capabilities of an interface
rather than its artistic potential. Concerts focus on the
performative aspects of each interface, which is given full
attention on stage, but there are not so many opportunities
for critical feedback from the community.
In this workshop, we would like to experiment with a
new format for trying out and talking about new interfaces.
Inspired by the salons of 18th and 19th centuries where
composers, virtuosos and aficionado gathered around a pi-
ano to play and discuss new music, we propose a salon-style
workshop on the topic of new keyboard instruments and in-
terfaces. We hope to gather both designers and artists from
established musical practices outside NIME to share their
expertise both in discussion and in hands-on experimenta-
tion.
Though the workshop, we want to focus on the experi-
ence of new keyboard instruments. For instrument-builders
within NIME, exploring questions of how to extend a NIME
into a wider artistic community. For artists, we’re interested
in exploring how their creative practice can influence other
musicians and designers.

Authors
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →
TW

Thomas Walther

Co-Founder, Humtap
My startup is hiring: MIR and automated composition/mixing/mastering experts. | | Feel free to talk to me about NIMEs for keyboards and anything related to main stream music NIMEs, i.e. stuff applicable to regular, average musicians.


Monday June 30, 2014 14:00 - 17:00
Richard Hoggart Building: RHB167 (Music Dept) Goldsmiths campus

14:00

Musical Metacreation Tutorial (MUME)
Please note, attendance to NIME 2014 workshops is by registration only. For more information on how to apply, please visit: http://www.metacreation.net/mume-nime2014/tutorial/

This three hours tutorial aims at introducing the field of musical metacreation (MUME) and its current developments, promises, and challenges, with a particular focus on NIME-relevant aspects of the field.

Thanks to continued progress in artistic and scientific research, a new possibility has emerged in our musical relationship with technology: Musical Metacreation. MUME involves using tools and techniques from artificial intelligence, artificial life, and machine learning, themselves often inspired by cognitive and life sciences, to endow machines with musical creativity. Concretely, it brings together artists, practitioners and researchers interested in developing systems that autonomously (or interactively) recognize, learn, represent, compose, complete, accompany, or interpret musical data.

Besides introducing the field of musical metacreation (MUME) and its current developments, the tutorial will bring to the front NIME-relevant aspects of the field, such as: musical interfaces for the collaboration between human performers and creative software "partners", the development of interfaces and instrument that foster and support computer-assisted musical creativity.
 

Authors
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
avatar for Philippe Pasquier

Philippe Pasquier

ISEA2015 Symposium Director, Associate Professor, Scool of Interactive Arts + Technology
Dr. Philippe Pasquier is Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology. He is both a recognized scientist and a multi-disciplinary artist. His contributions range from theoretical research in artificial intelligence, multi-agent systems and machine learning to applied artistic research and practice in digital art, computer music, and generative art. Philippe is the Chair and investigator of the AAAI... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 14:00 - 17:00
Education Building: Room EB225 Goldsmiths campus

17:00

NIME Opening Reception
We would like to welcome all registered delegates to the NIME2014 opening reception on the terrace of The New Academic Building.  Our exhibition programme opens at 5pm in the Weston Atrium, then we’ll have drinks upstairs on the 3rd floor terrace. There will be performances of Dieter Vandoren and Mariska de Groot's Shadow Puppet on the 3rd floor NAB314 at 5pm and 7pm.
 
From 6-7pm, peforming jazz standards, we'll have a quartet with computer jazz pioneer and former co-director of the Swiss Center for Computer Music, Bruno Spoerri on saxophone, Sony Computer Science Laboratory researcher François Pachet on guitar, Goldsmith's Pro-Warden for Research and Enterprise Mark d'Inverno on piano, Mick Grierson on bass, and Goldsmiths researcher and Rephlex Records artist Matthew Yee-King on drums.

You will be able to comment and tag the recording using Goldsmiths and Sony CSL's EU PRAISE project social music community platform, Music Circle

We’ll then move to Deptford Town Hall for the Monochrome NIME concert at 8pm.

Artists
BS

Bruno Spoerri

Bruno Spoerri is a saxophonist and technologist who creates works for improvising musicians with interactive electronic devices.  He was Co-Director of the Swiss Center for Computer Music and has toured extensively with Joel Chadabe, Joel Vandroogenbroeck, in the USA (Composer's Forum New York, Princeton University, Colgate University, Rensselaer), Canada (McGill University Montreal), India and Africa with the solo program "CAJ... Read More →
FP

François Pachet

François Pachet is director of SONY Computer Science Laboratory Paris, where he leads the music research team. The team conducts research on interactive music listening, composition and performance. Since its creation, the team developed several award winning technologies (constraint-based spatialization, intelligent music scheduling using metadata) and systems (MusicSpace, PathBuilder, Continuator for interactive music improvisation, etc... Read More →
MD

Mark d'Inverno

Mark d’Inverno is Professor of Computer Science and Pro-Warden for Research and Enterprise University at Goldsmiths, University of London, and for four years between 2007 and 2011 was head of the Department of Computing which has become one of Europe’s leading centres for interdisciplinary research and teaching especially in the arts increasingly in the social sciences.  He has published over 100 articles including... Read More →
MY

Matthew Yee-King

Matthew Yee­King is a postdoctoral research fellow at Goldsmiths College, where he is working on a project to develop a social network for music learners. Also he is a computer music composer, performer and researcher. He has worked in a range musics from the use of agent based live improvisers through more straight ahead electronic music to free improv with jazz players. He has performed live internationally and nationally as well as... Read More →
MG

Mick Grierson

Dr. Mick Grierson is an experimental artist specialising in real-time interactive audiovisual research, with specific focus on cognition and perception. He works in film, music, and software development, both inside and outside industry, designing, developing and producing new approaches to creating audiovisual experience.



Monday June 30, 2014 17:00 - 19:45
New Academic Building Terrace: 3rd Floor Goldsmiths campus

17:01

[Monochrome NIME part I]

A theatrical opening to NIME 2014, the two-part event ‘monochrome NIME’ sees the full range of light and sound interactions.  These timed performances invite you to be subsumed in an interplay of embodied performance and analog machinery.


Shadow Puppet?
Dieter Vandoren and Mariska de Groot
(Performances at 5pm, 6pm and 7pm) 



Monday June 30, 2014 17:01 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Third Floor

17:01

Mariska de Groot and Dieter Vandoren - Shadow Puppet?
Shadow Puppet?

Shadow Puppet? presents an interplay of embodied performance and analog machinery that gives rise to an engulfing play of light, shadow and raw optical sound. Two performers – one behind the machines and one in the spotlights – play this light-to-sound instrument in a dynamic tension of attraction and repulsion. It never gets quite clear who is conducting who...

In this project Dieter Vandoren and Mariska de Groot present a special collaboration wherein they integrate their respective expertise in embodied performance and optical sound. Mariska shoots beams of light coded by graphical patterns engraved on motorized wheels. Dieter wears light sensors on his body, improvising a live optical-sound piece by catching fragments of the rotating light-shadow patterns through his movements. When touched by Dieter’s body, music is revealed hidden within Mariska’s mesmerizing projections. 

Performances will be at 5pm, 6pm and 7pm

 

Artists
DV

Dieter Vandoren

Dieter Vandoren (°1981, Belgium) is a media artist, performer and developer. His work balances on the edge of creative arts and scientific research & development. Drawing from his diverse backgrounds in music, informatics and interactive architecture, he is currently occupied with the development and performance of spatial, immersive audiovisual instruments with a strong focus on the embodied aspect of performance.
MD

Mariska de Groot

owner, Mariska de Groot
Intrigued by the phenomena and history of optical sound, Mariska de Groot [1982, NL] makes and performs comprehensive analog light-to-sound instruments and installations which explore this principle in new ways.Mariska studied graphic design BA in Arnhem [2000-2005] and received her masters diploma at the ArtScience interfaculty in 2012. In 2009/2010 Mariska received a Startstipendium from Fonds BKVB. In 2011 she was nominated for the STRP Talent... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:01 - 20:01
New Academic Building, Third Floor

17:15

[BEAM@NIME Kathy Hinde - Tipping Point]
TIPPING POINT

Bristol based artist Kathy Hinde is creating a new sonic installation and performance Tipping Point concerned with our relationship with water. The installation will reveal the sonic and visual phenomena resulting from changing water depths within an inter-dependant system.  It will explore the sonic complexities and possibilities of combining water with glass vessels and the resulting frequencies and feedback tones that are created through the changing depths and movement of water.  The work will form both a sound sculpture and the basis of a live performance. The piece is being developed with John Rowden at Bristol University's Scientific Glass Workshop. Custom made software will be programming by Matthew Olden.

A Cryptic commission for Sonica, supported by the PRS for Music Foundation Britten-Pears Foundation and The Hinrichsen Foundation. 

http://tippingpointwater.wordpress.com

Artists


Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 19:59
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

Colpersys4
Colpersys 4

Colpersys 4 (Collaborative Performance System for 4 voices) allows audiences to control a four channel soundscape through their smartphone by simply joining the Colpersys4 wifi.

The work is comprised of playful environments, drawing references from gaming, visual scores and linguistics, that either control layers of sound or allow the creation of chords and sequences.

Symbols in Colpersys4 denote a sound (consonant) and colours a shift in tone or filtering (a vowel modifier). The audience chose which interface they use, each are designed so that they are intriguing to play alone but become a lot more engaging when others join in.

Artists
SS

Steve Symons

Steve is a sound artist known for an innovative series of sonic augmented reality projects titled 'aura', more recently his 'Gigzine' project exploring mass-interaction at music events and as a member of the award winning Owl Project. He creates digital systems for his own use, which are often released as free and open-source tools via his muio.org ltd consultancy. | | Owl Project is a three person collaboration (Steve Symons, Simon... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Third Floor

17:15

Convergence
Convergence is a sound sculpture that presents a sonic impression of information saturation, with increased access to information represented as an increased level of noise.

The concept of convergence was chosen as a metaphor for the implications of data consumption via the Internet. Real­time data is converted into sound, and converged into a central location, whereby the sum of the information may be experienced by the viewers. 

Artists
JB

Jasmin Blasco

Jasmin Blasco is a French/American artist living in Los Angeles CA. | Trained in Music Technology at the California Institute of the Arts, he is interested in the narrative and sculptural aspects of sound. | He is developing an investigative and exploratory practice over a variety of media in which research and collaboration play a fundamental role. | | In 2013 he launched The NOISE INDEX, a collaborative research platform to explore... Read More →
JH

Jordan Hochenbaum

Jordan Natan Hochenbaum is an artist concerned with finding meaningful connections between music, art, and technology. Currently, his work involves designing novel interfaces for expressive user interaction and musical performance, multimodal sensor systems, and playing and composing in a wide range of musical genres, from electronic music to North Indian classical. As a musician, Jordan actively releases music under the Natan H moniker. As... Read More →
OV

Owen Vallis

Owen Vallis is a musician and artist interested in performance, sound, and technology. As a co-founder of Flipmu, Owen explores a diverse range of projects including producing other musicians, composing his own music, building audio processors, and designing new hardware interfaces for musical performance. Having lived in Toronto, Canada, Wellington, New Zealand, San Francisco, Nashville, and Los Angeles, Owen has been able to develop a broad and... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

Dirty Tangible Interfaces
Create music and graphic animation with expressive gestures, mold sonic landscapes by plowing through tapioca beads with the Dirty Tangible Interfaces!

DIRTI are physical controllers based on the interaction with real-world granular materials in which users get their hands to play and sculpt dunes and canyons, move a handful or just one tiny grain.

The infinite, natural nuances of the tapioca are amazing for interaction with computers. Scanning for density or movement of those materials allows, in this installation, to connect their sophisticated reality with real-time audio–graphic synthesis software in an inherently collaborative, expressive, and dynamic experience.



This project was made by the designers Matthieu Savary, Denis Pellerin, and Florence Massin from UserStudio, with the help of researcher Diemo Schwarz and the work of the ISMM (Sound, Music, Movement Interaction) team at Ircam, sound designer Roland Cahen, the early help of Romain Pascal, and support by the French National Research Agency funded research project Topophonie.



Artists
DS

Diemo Schwarz

Diemo Schwarz, born in Germany in 1969, is a researcher and developer at Ircam (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique-Musique, Paris), composer of electronic music, and musician on drums and laptop. | His research work includes improving interaction between musician and computer, and exploiting large masses of sound for interactive real-time sound synthesis, collaborating with composers such as Philippe Manoury, Dai... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Third Floor

17:15

DOT, a videogame with no winner
‘Dot, a videogame with no winner’ is performance with synchronized sounds and images, played by a audiovisual synthesizer built and programmed by the artist, and controlled by vintage videogame joysticks. The standalone instrument works without the need of a computer, and produces its own sounds and images. The project was created with the idea of criticizing some aspects of game logics, but using its own aesthetics, sounds and characteristic graphic elements. All images and sounds were created and programmed by the artist and they are played in real time, in a 30 minutes performance with the participation of the audience.

Artists
HR

Henrique Roscoe

Henrique Roscoe is a digital artist, musician and designer. Works in the audiovisual area since 2004. Has a conceptual and generative project called ‘HOL’. All the compositions seek a correspondence between audio and video and they are performed live or in the form of videos or installations.  Makes part of the audiovisual duo ‘ligalingha’. Develops interactive installations, programming in Processing, vvvv and... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Third Floor

17:15

Fade Out
Plein de vide - On Paul Destieu’s Fade Out by Caecilia E. Anderhub

With a furred tongue, sand between my teeth, a sore throat, and a sense of having witnessed a tragedy no-one else had perceived and of which the report would cause little ado – thus Fade Out finally released me into the shadow of the Galata Tower back in autumn 2011. But perhaps it was my fault that I hadn’t seen a comedy. Already on the stairs leading to the upper floor of the former tobacco factory in Istanbul’s Beyoğlu I had been drawn by the indecipherable clatter, a mighty roar that filled all the exhibition rooms. What I saw at first sight were bits of a conventional drum kit half-protruding from a cone, set solitary in an ochre-yellow sand and gravel pit in bright sunlight reminiscent of southern climes, as a powerful vertical percussionist eruption disgorged itself from the image. Or was it the gentle caress of a rubble load rattling down onto its partner?

I had stepped right in the middle of the screening and stayed until the last tiny pebble had dropped. Then I wanted to see the whole drama from the beginning, even though I could easily imagine its course. For just under a minute it consisted of an expressionless still life, with a breath of wind now and then gently tilting one of the cymbals or twitching a twig in the background foliage, a total immanence – until the scene is shattered by a barely perceived tremor after which a few particles, like droplets, begin to evoke the first gentle tones. Then, with flashing crescendo, impending fate unerringly delivers its lapidary freight, and the percussed instrument responds accordingly: with acoustic resistance, modulating in tone for as long as it can as slides constantly re-arrange the shape of the heap. The performance

ends once the musical set is silenced, incorporated into the cone, now part of the landscape. But a tiny bit of a cymbal protrudes like a final witness, ultimately thwarting the perfection. We are left to wonder what the other heaps might conceal.
Fade out. The inconspicuous acoustic diminuendo is complemented by the landslide’s agonising retardation, which postpones the long foreseeable end; indeed, what applies here
is the principle of the theory of self-organised criticality, to which the drama is subject. The fade out itself contrasts with the ever increasing abundance of material; the less we hear, the more substance is heaped around the acoustic soul. – A simple allegory, certainly, but of what? One is tempted to speak of a rencontre fortuite, a fortuitous bruitist encounter of gravel and drum kit in the cosmos of gravity, a dadaistic gesture the meaning of which is a lack of meaning as sober as it is merry.

Even today and after repeated viewing I find it quite strange that I stood there for a whole twelve-and-a-half minutes and watched this stoning of a drum kit, which, constantly and with sustained tension, that is to say, without any element of surprise, goes against every fundamental dramaturgical rule. In the same way we play Sudoku online – defying the need to make good use of our time – or asked to have the same fairy tale read out to us countless times, right through to the familiar, repeatedly redemptive ending, regardless of whether or not we understood it. Likewise, Fade Out, with its fateful reliable continuous narrative, provides us temporarily with a tragic homeland; but by contrast, it is the unpredictable deviations in the heap as it strives for perfection that bring us moments of excitement, tiny rediscovered irregularities in the stoic regularity which shatter the familiar unrelenting imperturbability of events – if only for an instant. They remind us of the hope for potential freedom or, depending on the mood, the fear of it.

Fogo, São Filipe, 03.08.2012 

Artists
PD

Paul Destieu

Paul Destieu lives and works in Marseille, France. | His researches question tech­nology and its impact on our envi­ronment. His work exa­mines the situation of machines within our society noti­ceably fed by the history of media. He uses cali­bration, syn­chro­ni­zation pro­cesses or setup confi­gu­ra­tions as many means for art pro­duction. His art pro­duction focuses on the virtual and... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

Humming Mississippi
Humming Mississippi is a sonic sculpture that performs a section of the Mississippi River on resonant wood planks as an organic instrument. In collaboration with researchers from Louisiana State University’s Coastal Hydraulics Lab a LIDAR scan of the Mississippi River floor was used to translate 18 miles of riverbed into individual planks of cedar. Small transducers attached to the back of each plank transform the board into a speaker colored by the individual characteristics of the wood and influenced by the carving of the river’s contours. The audio composition is generated based off a linear reading of river topology combined with a sonification of real­time river data including temperature, salt content, flow rate, and river height.

The piece is presently installed at the Louisiana State University Museum of Art until March 2014. As it’s currently operating the work provides interactivity with real­time river data. For the next showing of HummingMississippi the artists are extending the work into a multimodal form allowing for interaction with the installation through an online representation of the work. Individual panels from the river are presented to web users who are invited to explore the river’s depths. Device clicks or touches use the contours of the river to create a spectral pulse through the web browser on the local device and induce an immediate sonic response in the corresponding physical board. Aggregate user data is retained to create a heat map of interactions which is then used to guide the spectrum at the physical installation. The installation becomes a meta­instrument performed by web viewers and the river itself.

Artists
avatar for Derick Ostrenko

Derick Ostrenko

Assistant Professor, LSU
Frederick Ostrenko, is a media artist and Assistant Professor at Louisiana State University. He holds a joint ­appointment in the Digital Art concentration at the School of Art and the Cultural Computing research group at the Center for Computation and Technology. Derick creates physical and virtual systems that examine the intersections of media, culture, and technology. Derick received his MFA in Digital+Media from the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Allison

Jesse Allison

Experimental Music & Digital Media, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|United States
Jesse Allison is a professor at LSU in Experiment Music & Digital Media. As part of the AVATAR initiative, he is actively performing research and collaboration into ways that technology can expand what is possible in the arts. As an artist, Allison has disseminated works and research around the globe through live performance art, interactive installations, virtual and hybrid worlds installations, and paper presentations. Allison received his... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

I am not playing violin
I am not playing Violin “ is a kinetic sound installation, which makes use of a series of abandoned violins to compose automatic music. With the absence of performers and bows, an untraditional way in playing violins is displayed. 

Artists
JF

Jasper Fung

Jasper Fung (b.1988) is a Hong Kong based media artist, performer and musician. His work intertwines installation, music and sonic composition that significantly arouse introspection into today’s discourteous and coarse world alongside the rapid elimination of social interactiveness. Fung’s work explores the terrain over classical, alternative, sound and space, rooted in his determination to challenge any models of traditional... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

MirrorFugue
Artists
HI

Hiroshi Ishii

Associate Director, MIT Media Lab
Where the sea meets the land, life has blossomed into a myriad of unique forms in the turbulence of water, sand, and wind. At another seashore between the land of atoms and the sea of bits, we are now facing the challenge of reconciling our dual citizenships in the physical and digital worlds. Windows to the digital world are confined to flat square screens and pixels, or "painted bits." Unfortunately, one can not feel and confirm the virtual... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
Richard Hoggart Building, Electronic Music Studios Goldsmiths

17:15

Quotidian Record
Quotidian Record is a limited edition vinyl recording that features a continuous year of my location-tracking data. Each place I visited, from home to work, from a friend's apartment to a foreign city, is mapped to a harmonic relationship. 1 day is 1 rotation ... 365 days is ~11 minutes.

As the record turns, the markings on the platter indicate both the time as it rotates through every 24 hours and the names of the cities to which I travel. The sound suggests that our habitual patterns have inherent musical qualities, and that daily rhythms might form an emergent portrait of an individual.

Artists
HB

House, Brian

Brown University|Providence|RI|USA
Brian House is a media artist whose work traverses alternative geographies, experimental music, and a critical data practice. He is interested in the contingent qualities of information and how we experience time in network culture. By constructing embodied, participatory systems, he seeks to negotiate between algorithms and the rhythms of everyday life. | | Currently, Brian teaches in the Digital + Media program at the Rhode Island School of... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

Roboterstück
A tongue-in-cheek homage to Karlheinz Stockhausen’s famous total-serialist work Klavierstück XI, in which the performer glances at a sheet of music and randomly chooses to play from 15 notated fragments. In this case, virtual agents negotiate a texture – from 16 possible combinations – based upon the following features: slow/fast; sparse/dense; loud/soft; rhythmic/arhythmic. When the same texture has appeared three times, the performance is complete. 

Artists
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Mezzanines and Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

Rwar
Rwar! A Study in Sonic Skulls
Recreation of a lambeosaurine hadrosaur, Corythosaurus skull and nasal passages 3D printed and machined from CT scans of fossils. Performers and gallery vistors create sound by blowing into the mechanical larynx and it gets resonated by the dinosaur's nasal passages. This project is supported by 2012-13 GPSA Graduate Research Support Program Award, and was shown at the Emerge Festival Showcase, March 1-2. Another related project, a composition for this instrument, tuba, tape, and live electronics, "How to Speak Dinosaur: Courtship" was be premiered on April 15, 2013 at Katzin Recital Hall, Arizona State University.

Artists
avatar for Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown is an interactive sound artist, Argentine tango dancer, and computer music researcher. She is a doctoral candidate in Digital Media and Performance at Arizona State University, and a graduate of Dartmouth’s Electroacoustic Master’s Program. A former Fulbright Fellow, she developed interactive Argentine tango dance during her residency in Buenos Aires, Argentina. This on-going project gives dancers agency over music, their... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Mezzanines and Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

Sense Boxes
Sense Boxes: Interactive Installation for small boxes, fabric, sensors, headphones & electronics

If one could touch sound, what would if feel like?

We are constantly touched by sound in the world around us. But it touches us, we don’t touch it.  In this interactive installation for fabric, sensors, sounds & headphones, participants are invited to discover what a sound might feel like if we could hold it in our hands, through one artist’s vision. Like the selected physical material, the sounds used are highly textural. They were then connected to a sonic “fuzzy” sound with a physical “fuzzy material”. The participant gently pushes, pulls, squeezes, and stretches the material, which manipulates the sounds coming through the headphones. Sensitivities are rewarded with subtle interactive moments.

Artists
HF

Heather Frasch

HEATHER FRASCH is a sound artist whose work explores the intersection of acoustic & electroacoustic composition, improvisation, interactive performance, new media theory and sound installations. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley where she studied composition with Franck Bedrossian, and interactive electronic music at CNMAT with Edmund Campion & David Wessel. Her music has been performed at festivals and... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Third Floor

17:15

s_platters
Artists
FA

Freida Abtan

Freida Abtan is a Canadian multi-disciplinary artist and composer. Her music falls somewhere in between musique concrete and more modern noise and experimental audio and both genres are influential to her sound. Her work has been compared to bands such as Coil, and Zoviet France, because of her use of spectral manipulation and collage. | Freida primarily works with samples of both musical and non-musical objects that she records herself and then... Read More →


Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Weston Atrium Goldsmiths

17:15

The Octopus
The Octopus is a non-digital interface for musical expression re-examining two historically significant technologies, film and analog modular synthesis, both currently experiencing a revival of popularity. The installation consists of an 8mm projector and an arrangement of light sensors on the projection screen. The light sensors supply control voltages to an analog modular synthesizer. Original handmade 8mm films produced specifically as visual scores for the Octopus create a live synaesthetic audio-visual composition. 

Artists
AM

Axel Mulder

President, Infusion Systems
May I-CubeX you ?
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  



Monday June 30, 2014 17:15 - 20:00
New Academic Building, Third Floor

20:00

[Monochrome NIME part II]

Monochrome NIME continues with layered and cinematic electro-acoustic pieces to stroboscopic, synaesthetic submersion; analogue technology meets digital possibility through intense, percussive mechanisms and the fluidity of the human body.

Abrasive Stanza No. 1
Mo Zareei

Sound Stream  
Andrew Johnston, Andrew Bluff and Linda Walsh  

eVanescens  
Todor Todoroff and Laura Colmenares Guerra with Sigrid Vandenbogaerde

Possession Trance (or Alchemical Interfaces for Opening Flicker Portals in Optic Nerve Fibers)
Ryan Jordan




Monday June 30, 2014 20:00 - 21:40
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

20:15

Mo Zareei - Abrasive Stanza No. 1
Abrasive Stanza No. 1

Abrasive Stanza No. 1 is an audiovisual performance using four custom-built mechatronic noise-intoners (Rasper). In this performance, the interlocking patterns of mechanically produced noise are accompanied by pulsating bursts of computer-generated sine tones, creating a hybrid state in a trade-off between irregular and regular, acoustic and digital, noise and signal. The work is an effort to highlight the potential aesthetics of some mundane aural/visual phenomena of the urban technological life, by formalizing them through grids of metric rhythms, and flaunting their bodily existence.  

Artists
avatar for Mo H. Zareei

Mo H. Zareei

PhD Candidate, Victoria University of Wellington
Mo H. Zareei is a sound artist and music technology researcher. Using custom-built software and hardware, his experiments with sound covers a wide range from electronic compositions to mechatronic sound-sculptures and installations. Striving to turn the harsh, unwanted, and unnoticeable into the pleasing and accessible, Zareei’s work is particularly targeted at the point where noise meets grid-based structures. He is currently pursuing his... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 20:15 - 20:35
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

20:35

Andrew Johnston, Andrew Bluff and Linda Walsh - Sound Stream
Sound Stream 

Sound Stream 
itself blurs the boundaries between instrumental performance, gestural interaction and dance. Largely improvised with a predetermined high-level structure, the work explores the relationships between acoustic sounds, instrumental gestures and expressive gestures and between sound and image. Technically the work involves motion tracking and real-time fluid simulation coupled with real-time audio analysis and synthesis. The acoustic performer’s gestures are tracked using an infra-red camera, and these gestures effectively ‘stir’ a real-time fluid simulation which is projected onto a scrim in front of the performer. 

Artists
AB

Andrew Bluff

Andrew Bluff is an emerging new media artist with commercial software development experience in the creative media industries. Recently completing a Bachelor in Sound and Music Design, Andrew pushes the boundaries of creative and interactive technologies to explore new sonic territories, visual motifs and performance modalities.  Incorporating interactive theatre, mobile computing, concatenative synthesis and new music instrument design... Read More →
AJ

Andrew Johnston

Andrew is a researcher, interaction/software designer and musician based at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). He has qualifications in music performance and computing and a PhD combining the two. As a musician he has performed professionally with several Australian symphony orchestras, musicals and a number of other ensembles. His practice and research focuses on the design of systems that support experimental, exploratory approaches... Read More →
LW

Linda Walsh

Australian oboist Linda Walsh is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Newcastle, Australia, where she teaches music performance, improvisation and video editing. Following undergraduate study, Linda was awarded a Swiss Government Scholarship for postgraduate studies in Switzerland. Linda’s concert activity includes solo recitals, chamber music, and orchestral concerts. Current research interests include exploring new modes of expression... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 20:35 - 20:50
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

21:00

Todor Todoroff and Laura Colmenares Guerra with Sigrid Vandenbogaerde - eVanescens
eVanescens 

eVanescens 
is an interactive audio-visual performance, a journey through various states, at the ever-shifting border between the real world and a constantly reinvented oneiric universe.  eVanescens draws the viewer in an uncertain world, between disturbing strangeness, lightness and feelings of weightlessness. The cellist wears sensors on her chest, arms and hands that allow the tracking of her movements. These sensors link to sound analysis techniques (extraction of the frequency, the envelope, harmonic content, ...) and gestural interfaces handled by the two other interpreters, control software that (re)synthesizes and multiplies in real time sound and image. Combined, they increase the expressive possibilities of the instruments, defining new musical gestures and offering innovative writing techniques.

More info, credits & co-producers : www.evanescens.net 

Artists
LC

Laura Colmenares Guerra

Laura Colmenares Guerra is a Colombian/Spanish visual artist based in Brussels. In 2002 she obtained a Masters degree in Audiovisual Media at Los Andes University in Bogota and in 2008 a Postgraduate Master in Transmedia Studies, Brussels. In 2000 she started her career working as a VJ while developing both visual pieces and audiovisual immersive installations. Her creation is related to the practice of performance art; regardless of whether it... Read More →
SV

Sigrid Vandenbogaerde

Sigrid Vandenbogaerde (1969) graduated from " Conservatoire Royal de Musique de Bruxelles". She won the public prize and first prize in Aberdeen's International Competition. She studied further with Mark Dobrinski and Radu Aldulescu. She was a member of the RTBF orchestra and played withBeethoven Academie, Vlaams Opera, I Fiamminghi, … Se also played chamber music with Spring... Read More →
TT

Todor Todoroff

Président, Art, Recherche, Technologie et Musique
Todor Todoroff is an Electrical Engineer from the Free University of Brussels, First Prize and Higher Degree in Electroacoustic Composition in the Conservatories of Brussels and Mons.  His electroacoustic music shows a special interest for sound spatialisation and research into new forms of interaction and sound transformation where gesture plays an important part. He composes music for concert, film, video, dance, theatre, and sound... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 21:00 - 21:25
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

21:25

Ryan Jordan - Possession Trance
POSSESSION TRANCE (OR ALCHEMICAL INTERFACES FOR OPENING FLICKER PORTALS IN OPTIC NERVE FIBERS) 

“Possession Trance” is an ongoing live performance project exploring the crossover between cybernetics, underground rave music and (oc)cult rituals. This performance will focus on alchemical interfaces for opening flicker portals in optic nerve fibers. Flicker portals occur when experiencing the Bucha effect for a prolonged amount of time and are related to psychedelic hallucinations where if followed for long enough lead to a breaking down of the Ego and a possible glimpse into the unknown. A not too distant incarnation of Haasan-i Sabbah, through the mind of Brion Gysin, had accessed this and claimed that through flicker he had found a portal into the space-time continuum. The interface to be presented for NIME 2014 is not only a musical one but an interface of consciousness; a cosmic cybernetic interface. 



Artists
RJ

Ryan Jordan

Ryan Jordan is a digital artist conducting experiments in derelict electronics, possession trance, retro-death-telegraphy and hylozoistic neural computation. His work focuses on self-built hardware, signal aesthetics, and the physical/material nature of experience. Jordan’s live performances make excessive use of stroboscopic light, high volume noise, and electronic stimulation of rocks in an attempt to induce hallucinatory and trance... Read More →



Monday June 30, 2014 21:25 - 21:40
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths
 
Tuesday, July 1
 

08:30

Conference REGISTRATION
Upon arrival, you should visit the registration desk in the New Academic Building cafe to register and collect your conference bag and programme.  

Registration will be open daily from 8.30am - 2pm.

Tuesday July 1, 2014 08:30 - 14:00
New Academic Building Cafe Ground Floor

09:00

[INSTALLATIONS]
We are excited to present a range of installations from NIME artists and researchers:

Fordham Park

The Pedalling Games (Kaffe Matthews)

New Academic Building, Weston Atrium

Tipping Point (Kathy Hinde)

Acoustic Cluster (Mari Ohno)

DOT, a videogame with no winner (Henrique Roscoe)

s_platters (Freida Abtan)

Quotidian Record (Brian House)

FADE OUT (Paul Destieu)

I am not playing violin (Jasper Fung)

Humming Mississippi (Jesse Allison and Frederick Ostrenko)

Convergence (Jordan Hochenbaum, Owen Vallis and Jasmin Blasco)

New Academic Building, Top Floor

Sense Boxes (Heather Frasch)

The Octopus (Michael Lyons, Haruka Mitani, Palle Dahlstedt and Axel Mulder)

Dirty Tangible Interfaces (Matthieu Savary, Diemo Schwarz, Denis Pellerin, Florence Massin and Roland Cahen)

Colpersys4 (Steve Symons)

New Academic Building, Mezzanines + Atrium

Rwar (Courtney Brown and Sharif Razzaque)

Roboterstück (Arne Eigenfeldt)

Deptford Town Hall

Echo Moiré (Matteo Marangoni)

Electronic Music Studios, Richard Hoggart Building

MirrorFugue (Xiao Xiao and Hiroshi Ishii)
 

Artists
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
AM

Axel Mulder

President, Infusion Systems
May I-CubeX you ?
avatar for Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown is an interactive sound artist, Argentine tango dancer, and computer music researcher. She is a doctoral candidate in Digital Media and Performance at Arizona State University, and a graduate of Dartmouth’s Electroacoustic Master’s Program. A former Fulbright Fellow, she developed interactive Argentine tango dance during her residency in Buenos Aires, Argentina. This on-going project gives dancers agency over music, their... Read More →
avatar for Derick Ostrenko

Derick Ostrenko

Assistant Professor, LSU
Frederick Ostrenko, is a media artist and Assistant Professor at Louisiana State University. He holds a joint ­appointment in the Digital Art concentration at the School of Art and the Cultural Computing research group at the Center for Computation and Technology. Derick creates physical and virtual systems that examine the intersections of media, culture, and technology. Derick received his MFA in Digital+Media from the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
DS

Diemo Schwarz

Diemo Schwarz, born in Germany in 1969, is a researcher and developer at Ircam (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique-Musique, Paris), composer of electronic music, and musician on drums and laptop. | His research work includes improving interaction between musician and computer, and exploiting large masses of sound for interactive real-time sound synthesis, collaborating with composers such as Philippe Manoury, Dai... Read More →
FA

Freida Abtan

Freida Abtan is a Canadian multi-disciplinary artist and composer. Her music falls somewhere in between musique concrete and more modern noise and experimental audio and both genres are influential to her sound. Her work has been compared to bands such as Coil, and Zoviet France, because of her use of spectral manipulation and collage. | Freida primarily works with samples of both musical and non-musical objects that she records herself and then... Read More →
HF

Heather Frasch

HEATHER FRASCH is a sound artist whose work explores the intersection of acoustic & electroacoustic composition, improvisation, interactive performance, new media theory and sound installations. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley where she studied composition with Franck Bedrossian, and interactive electronic music at CNMAT with Edmund Campion & David Wessel. Her music has been performed at festivals and... Read More →
HR

Henrique Roscoe

Henrique Roscoe is a digital artist, musician and designer. Works in the audiovisual area since 2004. Has a conceptual and generative project called ‘HOL’. All the compositions seek a correspondence between audio and video and they are performed live or in the form of videos or installations.  Makes part of the audiovisual duo ‘ligalingha’. Develops interactive installations, programming in Processing, vvvv and... Read More →
HI

Hiroshi Ishii

Associate Director, MIT Media Lab
Where the sea meets the land, life has blossomed into a myriad of unique forms in the turbulence of water, sand, and wind. At another seashore between the land of atoms and the sea of bits, we are now facing the challenge of reconciling our dual citizenships in the physical and digital worlds. Windows to the digital world are confined to flat square screens and pixels, or "painted bits." Unfortunately, one can not feel and confirm the virtual... Read More →
HB

House, Brian

Brown University|Providence|RI|USA
Brian House is a media artist whose work traverses alternative geographies, experimental music, and a critical data practice. He is interested in the contingent qualities of information and how we experience time in network culture. By constructing embodied, participatory systems, he seeks to negotiate between algorithms and the rhythms of everyday life. | | Currently, Brian teaches in the Digital + Media program at the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
JB

Jasmin Blasco

Jasmin Blasco is a French/American artist living in Los Angeles CA. | Trained in Music Technology at the California Institute of the Arts, he is interested in the narrative and sculptural aspects of sound. | He is developing an investigative and exploratory practice over a variety of media in which research and collaboration play a fundamental role. | | In 2013 he launched The NOISE INDEX, a collaborative research platform to explore... Read More →
JF

Jasper Fung

Jasper Fung (b.1988) is a Hong Kong based media artist, performer and musician. His work intertwines installation, music and sonic composition that significantly arouse introspection into today’s discourteous and coarse world alongside the rapid elimination of social interactiveness. Fung’s work explores the terrain over classical, alternative, sound and space, rooted in his determination to challenge any models of traditional... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Allison

Jesse Allison

Experimental Music & Digital Media, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|United States
Jesse Allison is a professor at LSU in Experiment Music & Digital Media. As part of the AVATAR initiative, he is actively performing research and collaboration into ways that technology can expand what is possible in the arts. As an artist, Allison has disseminated works and research around the globe through live performance art, interactive installations, virtual and hybrid worlds installations, and paper presentations. Allison received his... Read More →
JH

Jordan Hochenbaum

Jordan Natan Hochenbaum is an artist concerned with finding meaningful connections between music, art, and technology. Currently, his work involves designing novel interfaces for expressive user interaction and musical performance, multimodal sensor systems, and playing and composing in a wide range of musical genres, from electronic music to North Indian classical. As a musician, Jordan actively releases music under the Natan H moniker. As... Read More →
KM

Kaffe Matthews

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project... Read More →
MM

Matteo Marangoni

Matteo Marangoni is a DIY enthusiast that operates at the margins of various artistic disciplines. His practice investigates the perception of space and the subject-object dichotomy through processes that articulate the real within idiosyncratic rituals. He is a founding member of the artist collective iii, curates the nomadic performance series “No Patent Pending” and writes about self-made performative media on Neural... Read More →
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →
OV

Owen Vallis

Owen Vallis is a musician and artist interested in performance, sound, and technology. As a co-founder of Flipmu, Owen explores a diverse range of projects including producing other musicians, composing his own music, building audio processors, and designing new hardware interfaces for musical performance. Having lived in Toronto, Canada, Wellington, New Zealand, San Francisco, Nashville, and Los Angeles, Owen has been able to develop a broad and... Read More →
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  
PD

Paul Destieu

Paul Destieu lives and works in Marseille, France. | His researches question tech­nology and its impact on our envi­ronment. His work exa­mines the situation of machines within our society noti­ceably fed by the history of media. He uses cali­bration, syn­chro­ni­zation pro­cesses or setup confi­gu­ra­tions as many means for art pro­duction. His art pro­duction focuses on the virtual and... Read More →
SS

Steve Symons

Steve is a sound artist known for an innovative series of sonic augmented reality projects titled 'aura', more recently his 'Gigzine' project exploring mass-interaction at music events and as a member of the award winning Owl Project. He creates digital systems for his own use, which are often released as free and open-source tools via his muio.org ltd consultancy. | | Owl Project is a three person collaboration (Steve Symons, Simon... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:00 - 18:00
Various Locations Golsmiths

09:30

Opening
Opening presentation by the Scientific Chairs: Baptiste Caramiaux and Koray Tahiroğlu

Authors
BC

Baptiste Caramiaux

Research Associate, Goldsmiths, University of London
Researcher, Baptiste Caramiaux is currently working at Goldsmiths, University of London. His work focuses on Human Motion, Interaction Design, Sound, Perception and Computational Systems. He received a PhD in acoustic, signal processing and computer science applied to music from University Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), in December 2011. He completed his PhD at IRCAM – Centre Pompidou, in Paris, France. His research at IRCAM examined the... Read More →
avatar for Koray Tahiroğlu

Koray Tahiroğlu

Research Fellow, Aalto University|Espoo||Finland
http://sopi.aalto.fi/


Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:30 - 09:45
New Academic Building: LG02

09:45

[SESSION 1] MUSICIANSHIP, PRACTICE-BASED RESEARCH
Session on Musicianship, Practice-based Research

Session chair:  Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Moderators
avatar for Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Associate Professor, Head of Department, University of Oslo|Oslo||Norway
Alexander Refsum Jensenius (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is a music researcher and research musician working in the fields of embodied music cognition and new interfaces for musical expression (NIME). He is currently the Head of Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, where he also holds an associate professorship in music technology. Alexander studied informatics, mathematics, musicology, piano performance and music technology at UiO, Chalmers... Read More →

Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:45 - 10:54
New Academic Building: LG02

09:45

NIME, Musicality and Practice-led Methods
NIME, Musicality and Practice-led Methods
Owen Green
University of Edinburgh

Long Paper

To engage with questions of musicality is to invite into consideration a complex network of topics beyond the mechanics of soundful interaction with our interfaces. Drawing on the work of Born, I sketch an outline of the reach of these topics. I suggest that practice-led methods, by dint of focussing on the lived experience where many of these topics converge, may be able to serve as a useful methodological `glue' for NIME by helping stimulate useful agonistic discussion on our objects of study, and map the untidy contours of contemporary practices. I contextualise this discussion by presenting two recently developed improvisation systems and drawing from these some starting suggestions for how attention to the grain of lived practice could usefully contribute to considerations for designers in terms of the pursuit of musicality and the care required in considering performances in evaluation.

Authors

Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:45 - 10:55
New Academic Building: LG02

09:45

Hybrid Resonant Assemblages: Rethinking Instruments, Touch and Performance in New Interfaces for Musical Expression
Hybrid Resonant Assemblages: Rethinking Instruments, Touch and Performance in New Interfaces for Musical Expression
John Bowers and Annika Haas
Culture Lab, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University, Culture Lab, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University, UK

Long Paper

This paper outlines a concept of hybrid resonant assemblages, combinations of varied materials excited by sound transducers, feeding back to themselves via digital signal processing. We ground our concept as an extension of work by David Tudor, Nicolas Collins and Bowers and Archer [NIME 2005] and draw on a variety of critical perspectives in the social sciences and philosophy to explore such assemblages as an alternative to more familiar ideas of instruments and interfaces. We lay out a conceptual framework for the exploration of hybrid resonant assemblages and describe how we have approached implementing them. Our performance experience is presented and implications for work are discussed. In the light of our work, we urge a reconsideration of the implicit norms of performance which underlie much research in NIME. In particular, drawing on the philosophical work of Jean-Luc Nancy, we commend a wider notion of touch that also recognises the performative value of withholding contact.

Authors
AH

Annika Haas

Berlin University of the Arts
Annika Haas is a researcher and media artist. With a background in European Media Studies, she is now studying Computational Arts at UDK Berlin. Her work is focused on theoretical and artistic investigations in the field of aesthetic philosophy and technology philosophy, e.g. by building ’non-instruments’ and reflecting on the relation of human and machine.


Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:45 - 10:56
New Academic Building: LG02

09:45

Examining the Perception of Liveness and Activity in Laptop Music: Listeners’ inference about what the performer is doing from the audio alone
Examining the Perception of Liveness and Activity in Laptop Music: Listeners’ inference about what the performer is doing from the audio alone
Oliver Bown, Renick Bell, Adam Parkinson
University of Sydney, Tama Art University,

Long Paper

Audiences of live laptop music frequently express dismay at the opacity of performer activity and question how “live” performances actually are. Yet motionless laptop performers endure as musical spectacles from clubs to concert halls, suggesting that for many this is a non-issue. Understanding these perceptions might help performers better achieve their intentions, inform interface design within the NIME field and help develop theories of liveness and performance. To this end, a study of listeners’ perception of liveness and performer control in laptop performance was carried out, in which listeners examined several short audio-only excerpts of laptop performances and answered questions about their perception of the performance: what they thought was happening and its sense of liveness. Our results suggest that audiences are likely to associate liveness with perceived performer activity such as improvisation and the audibility of gestures, whereas perceptions of generative material, backing tracks, or other preconceived material do not appear to inhibit perceptions of liveness.

Authors
avatar for Renick Bell

Renick Bell

Renick Bell is a doctoral student at Tama Art University in Tokyo, Japan. His current research interests are live coding, improvisation, and algorithmic composition using open source software. He is the author of Conductive, a library for live coding in the Haskell programming language. He has performed in Australia, Austria, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, and the United States. He is from West Texas but has lived in Tokyo since 2006.
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:45 - 10:57
New Academic Building: LG02

09:45

Improvising with the Threnoscope: Integrating Code, Hardware, GUI, Network, and Graphic Scores
Improvising with the Threnoscope: Integrating Code, Hardware, GUI, Network, and Graphic Scores
Thor Magnusson
University of Sussex

Short Paper

Live coding emphasises improvisation. It is an art practice that merges the act of musical composition and performance into a public act of projected writing. This paper introduces the Threnoscope system, which includes a live coding micro-language for drone-based microtonal composition. The paper discusses the aims and objectives of the system, elucidates the design decisions, and introduces in particular the code score feature present in the Threnoscope. The code score is a novel element in the design of live coding systems allowing for improvisation through a graphic score, rendering a visual representation of past and future events in a real-time performance. The paper demonstrates how the system’s methods can be mapped ad hoc to GUI- or hardware-based control.

Authors
TM

Thor Magnusson

Thor Magnusson's background in philosophy and electronic music informs prolific work in performance, research and teaching. His work focuses on the impact digital technologies have on musical creativity and practice, explored through software development, composition and performance. Thor's research is underpinned by the philosophy of technology and cognitive science, exploring issues of embodiment and compositional constraints in digital musical... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 09:45 - 10:58
New Academic Building: LG02

11:00

Dennis Van Tilburg - Musique Parabolique
Musique Parabolique

Armed with parabolic microphone and live sampling system Dennis van Tilburg takes his audience with wireless headphones on an auditory journey. During a walk through the neighbourhood he catches snatches of street scenes and mixes it live to a composition that manipulates reality. The show evokes associations with spy movies and defies the boundaries of privacy in public spaces when unsolicited outsiders become part of the performance. At unexpected moments it makes our experience eerie, surreal or absurdist.



Artists
DV

Dennis van Tilburg

www.dennisvantilburg.nl
 Musician and sound artist Dennis van Tilburg (1975) operates on the border where music disintegrates into chunks and where apparent loose sounds unexpectedly form wonderful music. He is always looking for new techniques to create an idiosyncratic sound palette. For Musique Parabolique Dennis finds inspiration in the ‘musique concrète’ from the forties and fifties of the last century.



Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:00 - 11:30
310NXRd 310 New Cross Road

11:00

Break
Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:00 - 11:30
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

[SESSION 2] COLLABORATIVE MUSIC MAKING
Session on Collaborative Music Making

Session chair: Sergi Jordà 

Moderators
Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 12:54
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Instrumenting the Interaction: Affective and Psychophysiological Features of Live Collaborative Musical Improvisation
Instrumenting the Interaction: Affective and Psychophysiological Features of Live Collaborative Musical Improvisation
Evan Morgan, Hatice Gunes, Nick Bryan-Kinns
Queen Mary University of London

Long Paper

New technologies have led to the design of exciting interfaces for collaborative music making. However we still have very little understanding of the underlying affective and communicative processes which occur during such interactions. To address this issue, we carried out a pilot study where we collected continuous behavioural, physiological, and performance related measures from pairs of improvising drummers. This paper presents preliminary findings, which could be useful for the evaluation and design of user-centred collaborative interfaces for musical creativity and expression.

Authors

Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 12:55
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Augmented Stage for Participatory Performances
Augmented Stage for Participatory Performances
Dario Mazzanti, Victor Zappi, Darwin Caldwell, Andrea Brogni
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Queen Mary University of London, DreamsLab - Scuola Normale Superiore

Long Paper

Designing a collaborative performance requires the use of paradigms and technologies which can deeply influence the whole piece experience. In this paper we define a set of six variables, and use them to describe and evaluate a number of platforms for participatory performances. Based on this evaluation, the Augmented Stage is introduced. Such concept describes how Augmented Reality techniques can be used to superimpose a performance stage with a virtual environment, populated with interactive elements. The manipulation of these objects allows spectators to contribute to the visual and sonic outcome of the performance through their mobile devices, while keeping their freedom to focus on the stage. An interactive acoustic rock performance based on this concept was staged. Questionnaires distributed to the audience and performers' comments have been analyzed, contributing to an evaluation of the presented concept and platform done through the defined variables.

Authors
DM

Dario Mazzanti

Fellow - PhD, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT)
avatar for Victor Zappi

Victor Zappi

Postdoctoral Fellow, Universtiy of British Columbia
_Electronic engineer in love with Music and New Media Art | _DMI design and test, vocal synthesis, embedded technologies, Virtual and Augmented Reality, dance and movement | _We don't necessarily have to talk about work ( ;


Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 12:56
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Touch Screen Collaborative Music: Designing NIME for Older People with Dementia
Touch Screen Collaborative Music: Designing NIME for Older People with Dementia
Stu Favilla and Sonja Pedell
Bent Leather Band, Swinburne University, Swinburne University

Long Paper

This paper presents new touch-screen collaborative music interaction for people with dementia. The authors argue that dementia technology has yet to focus on collaborative multi-user group musical interactions. The project aims to contribute to dementia care while addressing a significant gap in current literature. Two trials explore contrasting musical scenarios: the performance of abstract electronic music and the distributed performance of J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Findings presented in this paper; demonstrate that people with dementia can successfully perform and engage in collaborative music performance activities with little or no scaffolded instruction. Further findings suggest that people with dementia can develop and retain musical performance skill over time. This paper proposes a number of guidelines and design solutions.


Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 12:57
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

SoundXY4: Supporting Tabletop Collaboration and Awareness with Ambisonics Spatialisation
SoundXY4: Supporting Tabletop Collaboration and Awareness with Ambisonics Spatialisation
Anna Xambó, Gerard Roma, Robin Laney, Chris Dobbyn, Sergi Jordà
The Open University, Institute of Education, Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Long Paper

Co-located tabletop tangible user interfaces (TUIs) for music performance are known for promoting multi-player collaboration with a shared interface, yet it is still unclear how to best support the awareness of the workspace in terms of understanding individual actions and the other group members actions, in parallel. In this paper, we investigate the effects of providing auditory feedback using ambisonics spatialisation, aimed at informing users about the location of the tangibles on the tabletop surface, with groups of mixed musical backgrounds. Participants were asked to improvise music on "SoundXY4: The Art of Noise", a tabletop system that includes sound samples inspired by Russolo's taxonomy of noises. We compared spatialisation vs. no-spatialisation conditions, and findings suggest that, when using spatialisation, there was a clearer workspace awareness, and a greater engagement in the musical activity as an immersive experience. 

Authors
RL

Robin Laney

I am an academic, researching various topics in software and music computing. Most of the papers from my groups are available here: http://oro.open.ac.uk/view/person/rcl46.html Feel free to get in touch.
avatar for Anna Xambó

Anna Xambó

The Open University / Institute of Education


Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 12:58
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Experio: a Design for Novel Audience Participation in Club Settings
Experio: a Design for Novel Audience Participation in Club Settings
Bastiaan van Hout, Luca Giacolini, Bart Hengeveld, Mathias Funk, Joep Frens
Eindhoven University of Technology

Short Paper

When looking at modern music club settings, especially in the area of electronic music, music is consumed in a unidirectional way – from DJ or producer to the audience – with little direct means to influence and participate. In this paper we challenge this phenomenon and aim for a new bond between the audience and the DJ through the creation of an interactive dance concept: Experio. Experio allows for multiple audience participants influencing the musical performance through dance, facilitated by a musical moderator using a tailored interface. This co-creation of electronic music on both novice and expert levels is a new participatory live performance approach, which is evaluated on the basis of thousands of visitors who interacted with Experio during several international exhibitions.


Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 12:59
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

TreeQuencer: Collaborative Rhythm Sequencing - A Comparative Study
TreeQuencer: Collaborative Rhythm Sequencing - A Comparative Study
Niklas Klügel, Georg Groh, Gerhard Hagerer
Technische Universität München

Short Paper

In this contribution we will show three prototypical applications that allow users to collaboratively create rhythmic structures with successively more degrees of freedom to generate rhythmic complexity. By means of a user study we analyze the impact of this on the users' satisfaction and further compare it to data logged during the experiments that allow us to measure the rhythmic complexity created.

Authors
avatar for Gerhard Hagerer

Gerhard Hagerer

Collaboration in Generative Music, Musical Sciences, Computer Art, Simulation and Animation, Computer Science


Tuesday July 1, 2014 11:30 - 13:00
New Academic Building: LG02

13:00

Lunch
All registrants receive a catered lunch. There will be several stations set up across the New Academic Building so that your don't have to queue too much. 

Tuesday July 1, 2014 13:00 - 14:00
New Academic Building Cafe Ground Floor

13:00

[BEAM@NIME: Kaffe Matthews - The Pedalling Games]
The Pedalling Games is an interactive sonic bike piece made for Fordham Park, by Kaffe Matthews and the Bicrophonic Research Institute (BRI), commissioned by BEAM @ NIME.
Visitors can come cycle a bike in and around the park, making music that will change dependant on where they go and how fast they pedal. Playing with the changing daily life of the park, Matthews has hidden sounds that will seduce visitors to ride faster, stop static, spin in circles and cruise the paths, seeking sonic treasures or pausing in shadows finding quiet spots of listening. Reflecting ever changing relationships between human nature landscape, The Pedalling Games allows players to come explore this London park to make their own composition.

The Bicrophonic Research Institute (BRI) is an association that researches and collaborates to make and share music from bicycles by pedalling through landscapes alone or together. Through ten years of international projects, the BRI has developed the sonic bike which plays music that changes dependant on where and how fast the cyclist goes through a pair of bike-mounted speakers and bespoke software to GPS system, the cyclist becoming the performer and the passers by audience. Established by Kaffe Matthews and Dave Griffiths in 2014, the BRI's collaborators for this piece include George Haworth and Lyubo Popomov.                                                                                    

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project music for bodies. Her 2004 collaboration Weightless Animals was awarded a BAFTA, she received a NESTA Dreamtime Fellowship in 2005 and an Award of Distinction, Prix Ars Electronica 2006 for the work Sonic Bed_London. In February 2006 she was made an Honorary Professor of Music, Shanghai Music Conservatory, China and in 2009, a patron of the Galapagos shark conservation society.

Artists
KM

Kaffe Matthews

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project... Read More →



Tuesday July 1, 2014 13:00 - 18:00
Fordham Park

14:00

[SESSION 3] SENSING AND AUGMENTED INSTRUMENTS
Session on Sensing and Augmented Instruments

Session chair: Dan Overholt 

Moderators
Tuesday July 1, 2014 14:00 - 15:09
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Low-Latency Audio Pitch Tracking: A Multi-Modal Sensor-Assisted Approach
Low-Latency Audio Pitch Tracking: A Multi-Modal Sensor-Assisted Approach
Laurel Pardue, Dongjuan Nian, Christopher Harte, Andrew McPherson
Queen Mary University of London

Long Paper

This paper presents a multi-modal approach to musical instrument pitch tracking combining audio and position sensor data. Finger location on a violin fingerboard is measured using resistive sensors, allowing rapid detection of approximate pitch. The initial pitch estimate is then used to restrict the search space of an audio pitch tracking algorithm. Most audio-only pitch tracking algorithms face a fundamental tradeoff between accuracy and latency, with longer analysis windows producing better pitch estimates at the cost of noticeable lag in a live performance environment. Conversely, sensor-only strategies struggle to achieve the fine pitch accuracy a human listener would expect. By combining the two approaches, high accuracy and low latency can be simultaneously achieved.

Authors
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 14:00 - 15:10
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

The Actuated guitar: Implementation and user test on children with Hemiplegia
The Actuated guitar: Implementation and user test on children with Hemiplegia
Jeppe Larsen, Thomas Moeslund, Dan Overholt
Aalborg University

Long Paper

People with a physical handicap are often not able to engage and embrace the world of music on the same terms as normal functioning people. Musical instruments have been refined the last centuries which makes them highly specialized instruments that nearly all requires at least two functioning hands. In this study we try to enable people with hemiplegia to play a real electrical guitar by modifying it in a way that make people with hemiplegia able to actually play the guitar. We developed the guitar platform to utilize sensors to capture the rhythmic motion of alternative fully functioning limbs, such as a foot, knee or the head to activate a motorized fader moving a pick back and forth across the strings. The approach employs the flexibility of a programmable digital system which allows us to scale and map different ranges of data from various sensors to the motion of the actuator and thereby making it easier adapt to individual users. To validate and test the instrument platform we collaborated with the Helena Elsass Center during their 2013 Summer Camp to see if we actually succeeded in creating an electrical guitar that children with hemiplegia could actually play. The initial user studies showed that children with hemiplegia were able to play the actuated guitar by producing rhythmical movement across the strings that enables them to enter a world of music they so often see as closed.


Tuesday July 1, 2014 14:00 - 15:11
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Visualizing Song Structure on Timecode Vinyls
Visualizing Song Structure on Timecode Vinyls
Florian Heller and Jan Borchers
RWTH Aachen University

Short Paper

Although an analog technology, many DJs still value the turntable as an irreplaceable performance tool. Digital vinyl systems combine the distinct haptic nature of the analog turntable with the advantages of digital media. They use special records containing a digital timecode which is then processed by a computer and mapped to properties like playback speed and direction. These records, however, are generic and, in contrast to traditional vinyl, do not provide visual cues representing the structure of the track. We present a system that augments the timecode record with a visualization of song information such as artist, title, and track length, but also with a waveform that allows to visually navigate to a certain beat. We conducted a survey examining the acceptance of such tools in the DJ community and conducted a user study with professional DJs. The system was widely accepted as a tool in the DJ community and received very positive feedback during observational mixing sessions with four professional DJs.

Authors
FH

Florian Heller

RWTH Aachen University


Tuesday July 1, 2014 14:00 - 15:12
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Optical Measurement of Acoustic Drum Strike Locations
Optical Measurement of Acoustic Drum Strike Locations
Janis Sokolovskis and Andrew McPherson
Queen Mary University of London

Short Paper

This paper presents a method for locating the position of a strike on an acoustic drumhead. Near-field optical sensors were installed underneath the drumhead of a commercially available snare drum. By implementing time difference of arrival (TDOA) algorithm accuracy within 2cm was achieved in approximating the location of strikes. The system can be used for drum performance analysis, timbre analysis and can form a basis for an augmented drum performance system.

Authors
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →
avatar for Janis Sokolovskis

Janis Sokolovskis

PhD Research Student, Queen Mary, University of London
PhD Research Student at Centre for Digital Music at Queen Mary, University of London. | | Research interests - Augmented Instruments, Audio Analysis, Music Learning Technologies.


Tuesday July 1, 2014 14:00 - 15:13
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Techniques in Swept Frequency Capacitive Sensing: An Open Source Approach
Techniques in Swept Frequency Capacitive Sensing: An Open Source Approach
Colin Honigman, Jordan Hochenbaum, Ajay Kapur
California Institute of the Arts, California Institute of the Arts, Victoria University of Wellington

Short Paper

This paper introduces a new technique for creating Swept Frequency Capacitive Sensing with open source technology for use in creating richer and more complex musical gestures. This new style of capacitive touch sensing is extremely robust compared to older versions and will allow greater implementation of gesture recognition and touch control in the development of NIMEs. Inspired by the Touché project, this paper discusses how to implement this technique using the community standard hardware Arduino instead of custom designed electronics. The technique requires only passive components and can be used to enhance the touch sensitivity of many everyday objects and even biological materials and substances such as plants, which this paper will focus on as a case study through the project known as Cultivating Frequencies. This paper will discuss different techniques of filtering data captured by this system, different methods for creating gesture recognition unique to the object being used, and the implications of this technology as it pertains to the goal of ubiquitous sensing. Furthermore, this paper will introduce a new Arduino Library, SweepingCapSense, which simplifies the coding required to implement this technique.

Authors
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts


Tuesday July 1, 2014 14:00 - 15:14
New Academic Building: LG02

15:00

[SESSION 4] DEMOS
16-CdS: A Surface Controller for the Simultaneous Manipulation of Multiple Analog Components
Carlos Dominguez
Dartmouth Digital Musics

B.O.M.B. – Beat Of Magic Box -: Stand-Alone Synthesizer Using Wireless Synchronization System For Musical Session and Performance
Yoshihito Nakanishi, Seiichiro Matsumura, Chuichi Arakawa
Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies, The Univ. of Tokyo, School of Design, Tokyo University of Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo

CloudOrch: A Portable SoundCard in the Cloud
Abram Hindle
University of Alberta

Engravings for Prepared Snare Drum, iPad, and Computer
Timothy Polashek, Brad Meyer
Transylvania University, Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music

Funky Sole Music: Gait Recognition and Adaptive Mapping
Kristian Nymoen, Sichao Song, Yngve Hafting and Jim Torresen
University of Oslo

Probabilistic Models for Designing Motion and Sound Relationships
Jules Françoise, Norbert Schnell, Riccardo Borghesi and Frédéric Bevilacqua
IRCAM

Radear: A Tangible Spinning Music Sequencer
Daniel Gabana and Andrew McPherson
Queen Mary University of London

Rich Contacts: Corpus-Based Convolution of Piezo-Captured Audio Gestures for Enhanced Musical Expression
Diemo Schwarz, Alex Harker and Pierre Alexandre Tremblay
IRCAM, CERENEM

Rule-based Performative Synthesis of Sung Syllables
Lionel Feugère and Christophe d'Alessandro
LIMSI-CNRS

The Well-Sequenced Synthesizer
Luisa Pereira
Interactive Telecommunications Program, New York University


Authors
avatar for Jules Françoise

Jules Françoise

Postdoctoral Researcher, Ircam
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →
avatar for Yoshihito Nakanishi

Yoshihito Nakanishi

Researcher, Nihon University College of Art
KN

Kristian Nymoen

University of Oslo
TP

Timothy Polashek

Music Professor/Technology Studies Coordinator, Transylvania University
1) NIME project-- "Engravings for Prepared Snare Drum, iPad, and Computer" 2) Other Music Composition and Technology-- 3) my new book-- "The Word Rhythm Dictionary: A Resource for Writers, Rappers, Poets, and Lyricists "-- 4) and Kentucky Bourbon.
DS

Diemo Schwarz

Diemo Schwarz, born in Germany in 1969, is a researcher and developer at Ircam (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique-Musique, Paris), composer of electronic music, and musician on drums and laptop. | His research work includes improving interaction between musician and computer, and exploiting large masses of sound for interactive real-time sound synthesis, collaborating with composers such as Philippe Manoury, Dai... Read More →
avatar for Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Professor of Composition and Improvisation, University of Huddersfield


Tuesday July 1, 2014 15:00 - 16:00
New Academic Building: Room 314

15:00

[SESSION 4] POSTERS
A Gesture Detection with Guitar Pickup and Earphones
Sangwon Suh, Jeong-seob Lee, Woon Seung Yeo
GSCT, KAIST, KAIST

A Max/MSP Approach for Incorporating Digital Music via Laptops in Live Performances of Music Bands
Yehiel Amo, Gil Zissu, Shaltiel Eloul, Eran Shlomi, Dima Schukin, Almog Kalifa
SNU, Uni. of the arts, UK, Oxford Uni./BIU, BGU

A Real Time Common Chord Progression Guide on the Smartphone for Jamming Pop Song on the Music Keyboard
Simon Lui
Singapore University of Technology and Design

An Exploration of Peg Solitaire as a Compositional Tool
Kirsty Keatch
University of Edinburgh

Auraglyph: Handwritten Computer Music Composition and Design
Spencer Salazar and Ge Wang
Stanford University

Body As Instrument: Performing with Gestural Interfaces
Mary Mainsbridge and Kirsty Beilharz
University of Technology, Sydney

Circle Squared and Circle Keys - Performing on and with an unstable live algorithm for the Disklavier
Palle Dahlstedt
University of Gothenburg

Composing Embodied Sonic Play Experiences: Towards Acoustic Feedback Ecology
Akito van Troyer
MIT Media Lab

Design & Evaluation of an Accessible Hybrid Violin Platform
Dan Overholt and Steven Gelineck
Aalborg University Copenhagen, Aalborg University Copenhagen, Dep. of Architecture, Design and Media Technology

Dynamical Interactions with Electronic Instruments
Tom Mudd, Nick Dalton, Simon Holland, Paul Mulholland
The Open University

eMersion | Sensor-controlled Electronic Music Modules & Digital Data Workstation
Chet Udell and James Paul Sain
University of Oregon, University of Florida

FingerSynth: Wearable Transducers for Exploring the Environment and Playing Music Everywhere
Gershon Dublon and Joseph A. Paradiso
MIT Media Lab

Hand and Finger Motion-Controlled Audio Mixing Interface
Jarrod Ratcliffe
New York University

How to Make Embedded Acoustic Instruments
Edgar Berdahl
Louisiana State University

Interactive Parallax Scrolling Score Interface for Composed Networked Improvisation
Rob Canning
Goldsmiths College & Bournemouth University

Mobile Device Percussion Parade
Jeff Snyder, Avneesh Sarwate, Carolyn Chen, Noah Fishman, Quinn Collins, Cenk Ergun, Michael Mulshine
Princeton University

Musical Interface to Audiovisual Corpora of Arbitrary Instruments
Max Neupert and Joachim Goßmann

Bauhaus-Universität Weimar / Yeungnam University, DTS 



New Open-Source Interfaces for Group Based Participatory Performance of Live Electronic Music
Timothy J Barraclough, Jim Murphy, Ajay Kapur
Victoria University of Wellington

Orphion: A gestural multi-touch instrument for the iPad
Sebastian Trump and Jamie Bullock
Hochschule für Musik Nürnberg, Birmingham Conservatoire

Pd-L2Ork Raspberry Pi Toolkit as a Comprehensive Arduino Alternative in K-12 and Production Scenarios
Ivica Bukvic
Virginia TechInstitute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology

PiaF: A Tool for Augmented Piano Performance Using Gesture Variation Following
Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar, Baptiste Caramiaux, Atau Tanaka
Princeton University, Goldsmiths University of London

Pitch Canvas: Touchscreen Based Mobile Music Instrument
Bradley Strylowski and Jesse Allison
George Mason University, Louisiana State University

Reappropriating Museum Collections: Performing Geology Specimens and Meterology Data as New Instruments for Musical Expression
John Bowers and Tim Shaw
Culture Lab, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University

Rub Synth : A Study of Implementing Intentional Physical Difficulty Into Touch Screen Music Controllers
Ozan Sarier
Istanbul Technical University

Sound Analyser: A Plug-in for Real-Time Audio Analysis in Live Performances and Installations
Adam Stark
Independent

Tangle: a Flexible Framework for Performance with Advanced Robotic Musical Instruments
Paul Mathews, Ness Morris, Jim Murphy, Ajay Kapur, Dale Carnegie
Victoria University of Wellington, California Institute of the Arts, Victoria University of Wellington / New Zealand School of Music, California Institute of the Arts, Victoria University of Wellington

The Politics of Laptop Ensembles
Shelly Knotts and Nick Collins
Durham University


Moderators
AA

Alessandro Altavilla

Postgraduate Student (MPhil/PhD), Goldsmiths, University of London
MD

Marco Donnarumma

Co-Founder, Xth
Italian-born Marco Donnarumma is a performer, musician and writer based in London. He explores the dimensions of the human body in relation to real, virtual and cultural spaces through performances, concerts and installations. In his works, sound, machines and biology are configured so to integrate human and technological bodies into new living instances. His practice is considered a conceptually elaborated combination of physical actions... Read More →

Authors
MJ

Murphy, Jim

Victoria University of Wellington|Wellington||New Zealand
KS

Knotts, Shelly

Durham University|Durham|County Durham|United Kingdom
avatar for Edgar Berdahl

Edgar Berdahl

Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University
avatar for Ivica Bukvic

Ivica Bukvic

Associate Professor (School of Performing Arts) and Senior Fellow (Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology), Virginia Tech, ICAT, L2Ork, DISIS
Ubiquitous Interactvity, Laptop and Mobile Orchestras, Raspberry Pi Instrument and Installation Design, Mindfulness through Technology, Discipline-Agnostic Creativity, Interactive Technology in K-12 (Elementary Through High School) Education
avatar for Jamie Bullock

Jamie Bullock

Associate Professor, Music Technology, Birmingham City University
Director of Integra Lab, lead researcher and developer of Integra Live, and co-developer of ml-lib, a machine learning library for Max and Pure Data. | | I am interested in applied, artistic and technological research in digital interaction design, experience design, usability and natural user interfaces. | | My research group is currently exploring immersive, music-centred systems for live sound synthesis and transformation.
BC

Baptiste Caramiaux

Research Associate, Goldsmiths, University of London
Researcher, Baptiste Caramiaux is currently working at Goldsmiths, University of London. His work focuses on Human Motion, Interaction Design, Sound, Perception and Computational Systems. He received a PhD in acoustic, signal processing and computer science applied to music from University Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), in December 2011. He completed his PhD at IRCAM – Centre Pompidou, in Paris, France. His research at IRCAM examined the... Read More →
NC

Nick Collins

Nick Collins is Reader in Composition at Durham University. His research interests include live computer music, musical artificial intelligence, and computational musicology, and he is a frequent international performer as composer-programmer-pianist, from algoraves to electronic chamber music. His latest book, co-written with Scott Wilson and Margaret Schedel, is Electronic Music (Cambridge University Press Introductions series, 2013). ... Read More →
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  
avatar for Gershon Dublon

Gershon Dublon

PhD Candidate / Research Assistant, MIT Media Lab
skin, that covers me from head to toe except a couple tiny holes and openings where the city's blowin' in and out this is what it's all about, delightfully
SE

Shaltiel Eloul

My name is shalti, and I am now based in oxford. I am also a part of the music group syndrome. | Recently, I am mostly concerned on live-interactive projects involve random or statistical processes as instruments. Usually I try to target my music and projects to live performances, and therefore I would be happy to talk on new ideas to perform with and collaborations with interesting artists.
avatar for Steven Gelineck

Steven Gelineck

Assistant Professor, Aalborg University Copenhagen|Copenhagen||Denmark
Sonic interaction designer. Designs, makes, builds, programs interactive tools/interfaces for music with focus on the user.
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts
SL

Simon Lui

Assistant Professor, SUTD
Music app interviewed by CNN, #1 best selling app in 2011 / | Marie Curie Fellow / | Research interest: music on mobile, music information retrieval, music for the people with impairment, HCI of music application
MM

Mary Mainsbridge

University of Technology, Sydney
MN

Max Neupert

Yeungnam University
OS

Ozan SARIER

Researcher, Istanbul Technical University
AT

Atau Tanaka

Atau Tanaka studied Physical Sciences at Harvard and has a doctorate in Computer Music Composition from Stanford University’s CCRMA. He was awarded the Prix de Paris to conduct research in Paris at IRCAM, Centre Pompidou. His first inspirations came upon meeting John Cage during his Norton Lectures and would go to on re-create Cage’s Variations VII with Matt Wand and :zoviet*france:. In the 90’s he formed Sensorband with Zbigniew... Read More →
AV

Akito van Troyer

Research Assistant, MIT Media Lab
avatar for Sebastian Trump

Sebastian Trump

Hochschule für Musik Nürnberg
CU

Chet Udell

CEO/CTO, eMotion Technologies LLC
:: From the ancient cypress swamps of Wewahitchka, Chester (Chet) Udell received his Ph.D. at the University of Florida in Music Composition with Electrical Engineering emphasis and currently serves as Instructor of Music Technology & Intermedia at the University of Oregon. | | :: His dissertation research on novel musical interface design resulted in a registered U.S. patent (pending) and a technology startup company: eMotion Technologies... Read More →
GW

Ge Wang

Assistant Professor, Stanford University|Stanford|CA|United States


Tuesday July 1, 2014 15:00 - 16:00
New Academic Building: Room 314

16:00

Dennis Van Tilburg - Musique Parabolique
Musique Parabolique

Armed with parabolic microphone and live sampling system Dennis van Tilburg takes his audience with wireless headphones on an auditory journey. During a walk through the neighbourhood he catches snatches of street scenes and mixes it live to a composition that manipulates reality. The show evokes associations with spy movies and defies the boundaries of privacy in public spaces when unsolicited outsiders become part of the performance. At unexpected moments it makes our experience eerie, surreal or absurdist.



Artists
DV

Dennis van Tilburg

www.dennisvantilburg.nl
 Musician and sound artist Dennis van Tilburg (1975) operates on the border where music disintegrates into chunks and where apparent loose sounds unexpectedly form wonderful music. He is always looking for new techniques to create an idiosyncratic sound palette. For Musique Parabolique Dennis finds inspiration in the ‘musique concrète’ from the forties and fifties of the last century.



Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:00 - 16:30
310NXRd 310 New Cross Road

16:00

Echo Moiré
Echo Moiré is a robotic opera-ballet in which a pair of loudspeaker vehicles is employed to play a room as a musical instrument. Exploring the acoustic properties of the room, the vehicles create aural images that float in the air, enveloping listeners with patterns of echoes rebounding off the walls.

The work is inspired by Alvin Lucier's 1968 composition Vespers and investigates human echolocation, aural spatial perception and the physics of sound. Using mobile directional loudspeakers emitting trains of pulses, the trajectories followed by sound waves from source to listener are made apparent. Gradually scanning the room’s boundaries, aural images of the space are formed. Modulating the pulses over time, these images are manipulated and sculpted, giving rise to different spatial forms, textures and densities in which the audience is immersed. Providing a theatrical dramatization for the practice of acousmatic music, the project shifts sound spatialization out of the computational realm and into the physical world.

Performances will start at 4, 4.30, 5 and 5.30pm. The performance has a maximum audience capacity of 30 people. Access is permitted only at the start of each performance.  Please sign up at the Registration Desk.

Artists
MM

Matteo Marangoni

Matteo Marangoni is a DIY enthusiast that operates at the margins of various artistic disciplines. His practice investigates the perception of space and the subject-object dichotomy through processes that articulate the real within idiosyncratic rituals. He is a founding member of the artist collective iii, curates the nomadic performance series “No Patent Pending” and writes about self-made performative media on Neural... Read More →



Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:00 - 18:00
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

16:15

Break
Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:15 - 16:30
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

[SESSION 5] MOTION AND GESTURE
Session on Motion and Gesture

Session chair: Frédéric Bevilacqua 

Moderators
Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:30 - 17:54
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

Dynamics in Music Conducting: A Computational Comparative Study Among Subjects
Dynamics in Music Conducting: A Computational Comparative Study Among Subjects
Alvaro Sarasua and Enric Guaus
Escola Superior de Musica de Catalunya

Long Paper

Many musical interfaces have used the musical conductor metaphor, allowing users to control the expressive aspects of a performance by imitating the gestures of conductors. In most of them, the rules to control these expressive aspects are predefined and users have to adapt to them. Other works have studied conductors' gestures in relation to the performance of the orchestra. The goal of this study is to analyze, following the path initiated by this latter kind of works, how simple motion capture descriptors can explain the relationship between the loudness of a given performance and the way in which different subjects move when asked to impersonate the conductor of that performance. Twenty-five subjects were asked to impersonate the conductor of three classical music fragments while listening to them. The results of different linear regression models with motion capture descriptors as explanatory variables show that, by studying how descriptors correlate to loudness differently among subjects, different tendencies can be found and exploited to design models that better adjust to their expectations.

Authors
AS

Alvaro Sarasua

PhD Candidate, ESMUC / UPF


Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:30 - 17:55
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

Triggering sounds from discrete air gestures: What movement feature has the best timing?
Triggering sounds from discrete air gestures: What movement feature has the best timing?
Luke Dahl
CCRMA, Stanford University

Long Paper

The recent proliferation of affordable motion sensing technologies (e.g. Kinect) has led to a surge in new musical interfaces where a performer moves their body "in the air" without manipulating or contacting a physical object. These interfaces work well when the movement and control of sound are smooth and continuous. However it has proven difficult to heuristically design a system which will trigger discrete sounds with a precision that would allow for a complex rhythmic performance. In such systems the relationship between a gesture and the timing of the resulting sound often feels wrong to the performer.

Authors

Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:30 - 17:56
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

The Composing Hand: Musical Creation with Leap Motion and the BigBang Rubette
The Composing Hand: Musical Creation with Leap Motion and the BigBang Rubette
Daniel Tormoen, Florian Thalmann, Guerino Mazzola
University of Minnesota

Long Paper

This paper introduces an extension of the Rubato Composer software’s BigBang rubette module for gestural composition. The extension enables composers and improvisers to operate BigBang using the Leap Motion controller, which uses two cameras to detect hand motions in three-dimensional space. The low latency and high precision of the device make it a good fit for BigBang’s functionality, which is based on immediate visual and auditive feedback. With the new extensions, users can define an infinite variety of musical objects, such as oscillators, pitches, chord progressions, or frequency modulators, in real-time and transform them in order to generate more complex musical structures on any level of abstraction.

Authors

Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:30 - 17:57
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

Harmonic Motion: A toolkit for processing gestural data for interactive sound
Harmonic Motion: A toolkit for processing gestural data for interactive sound
Tim Murray-Browne and Mark Plumbley
Queen Mary University of London

Short Paper

We introduce Harmonic Motion, a free open source toolkit for artists, musicians and designers working with gestural data. Extracting musically useful features from captured gesture data can be challenging, with projects often requiring bespoke processing techniques developed through iterations of tweaking equations involving a number of constant values -- sometimes referred to as `magic numbers'. Harmonic Motion provides a robust interface for rapid prototyping of patches to process gestural data and a framework through which approaches may be encapsulated, reused and shared with others. In addition, we describe our design process in which both personal experience and a survey of potential users informed a set of specific goals for the software.

Authors
TM

Tim Murray-Browne

Researcher & Artist, Queen Mary University of London
I'm a research assistant at the Centre for Digital Music creating Harmonic Motion, software designed to make it easier to analyse movement data and draw out musical features. | | I'm also an artist working with interactive sound. I recently completed an interactive sound installation called The Cave of Sounds with the Music Hackspace last year. | | My next project is an interactive audiovisual dance work in collaboration with the... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:30 - 17:58
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

To gesture or not? An analysis of terminology in NIME proceedings 2001-2013
To gesture or not? An analysis of terminology in NIME proceedings 2001–2013
Alexander Refsum Jensenius
University of Oslo

Short Paper

The term 'gesture' has represented a buzzword in the NIME community since the beginning of its conference series. But how often is it actually used, what is it used to describe, and how does its usage here differ from its usage in other fields of study? This paper presents a linguistic analysis of the motion-related terminology used in all of the papers published in the NIME conference proceedings to date (2001– 2013). The results show that 'gesture' is in fact used in 62 % of all NIME papers, which is a significantly higher percentage than in other music conferences (ICMC and SMC), and much more frequently than it is used in the HCI and biomechanics communities. The results from a collocation analysis support the claim that 'gesture' is used broadly in the NIME community, and indicate that it ranges from the description of concrete human motion and system control to quite metaphorical applications.

Authors
avatar for Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Associate Professor, Head of Department, University of Oslo|Oslo||Norway
Alexander Refsum Jensenius (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is a music researcher and research musician working in the fields of embodied music cognition and new interfaces for musical expression (NIME). He is currently the Head of Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, where he also holds an associate professorship in music technology. Alexander studied informatics, mathematics, musicology, piano performance and music technology at UiO, Chalmers... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 16:30 - 17:59
New Academic Building: LG02

18:00

[Intimate NIME]
Unravelling the relationship of sound to material objects, this intimate concert features handheld instruments, playing with our perceptions of time and space along the way.

Auditorium
Rui Penha

Unsounding Objects
Ian Hattwick, Marcelo Wanderley, Preston Beebe, Fabrice Marandola, Zachary Hale and Philippe Leroux

Blind | The world where I can’t be but you live in Michi ni niji ~ Higure  

Akiko Hatakeyama

Old Socks in New Shoes

Bruno Spoerri

Ensemble Fabrique Nomade
Francis Faber, Tom Mays, Anne Cartel

 

Tuesday July 1, 2014 18:00 - 19:30
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:01

Rui Penha - Auditorium
Auditorium

auditorium
 is a piece for small percussion instruments, whose sound is captured by binaural microphones and manipulated by a computer. It explores four ideas: the new perspective over time enabled by the use of electronic means in performing arts, namely through looping, repetition and by raising awareness of the structure of events over time; the specific way of listening that emerges from binaural recording, developed in this case as a way to use the act of listening as the performing process; the gestural control over feedback; the use of digital means as hidden prosthesis that augment acoustical instruments.

Artists
RP

Rui Penha

Composer and performer of live electroacoustic music, Rui Penha was born in Porto in 1981. His music has been played in several venues and festivals around Europe, by foremost performers such as Nuno Aroso, Pedro Carneiro, Arditti Quartet, Remix Ensemble or the Gulbenkian Orchestra. He has a deep interest on music technology, both in software programming and the development of interfaces for musical expression. He was the founding curator of... Read More →



Tuesday July 1, 2014 18:01 - 18:21
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:20

Unsounding Objects
Unsounding Objects is a series of compositions for the SpectraSurface that examine various characteristics of the instrument. Two previous compositions, Unsounding Objects no. 1 & no. 2, were composed by Preston Beebe and respectively featured various bowls and various cymbals as performance interfaces. 

The SpectraSurface is a set of playing surfaces contained within a suitcase which are equipped with contact micro- phones. Found objects such as bowls, pipes, or toys are placed on top of the surfaces. The sounds from the contact mics are sent to a computer where they are analyzed for their important audio features; these features are then used to drive sound synthesis. The tradition of found objects in the percussion idiom (Henry Cowell, John Cage, Lou Har- rison) offers a familiar interface with unique timbral and temporal characteristics which produce interesting results in the analysis-synthesis platform of Unsounding Objects. 

Artists
IH

Ian Hattwick

Ian Hattwick (Instrument Design) is a composer, performer, and digital musical instrument designer. His current research focuses on collaborative approaches to music performance using gestural interfaces. In 2013 he co-created the Prosthetic Instruments, family of gestural controllers in- tended to be worn by dancers, for which he composed and presented two compositions at the Cacoyannis Institute in Athens, Greece. He holds an MFA from the... Read More →
PB

Preston Beebe

Preston Beebe (United States, born 1988) | | Montréal based composer and percussionist, Preston Beebe uses electronics and technology for both performance and composition. He develops interfaces for visual feedback to aid in live-electronic performances and is a co-developer of the SpectraSurface, a digital percussion interface which uses audio feature extractions to control sound synthesis. He holds a Masters in composition from McGill... Read More →
ZH

Zachary Hale

CIRMMT, McGill University
Zachary Hale is a Florida-born, Montreal-based composer and percussionist who creates and performs music that deals with live-electronics and new interfaces. His interest lies in the possibilities when the performer and technician are one in the same, and also bridging the gap between musicians and technology. He holds a Bachelor of Music in Percussion, Composition and Electronic Music from the University of South Florida and a Master of Music in... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 18:20 - 18:45
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:45

Akiko Hatakeyama - Blind | The world where I can’t be but you live in Michi ni niji ~ Higure
Blind | The world where I can’t be but you live in Michi ni niji ~ Higure 

Blind represents life and memories, a psychological and philosophical investigation on my current and past. The action of pulling thread from the custom instrument “Hako” is a metaphor of how retrieving memories works. 

Artists
AH

Akiko Hatakeyama

Akiko is a composer, singer, and video artist who is native to Yokohama, Japan. Akiko obtained her B.A. in music from Mills College and M.A. in Experimental Music/Composition at Wesleyan University, and currently studies in the MEME program at Brown University for her PhD. Her principal instructors include Alvin Lucier, Anthony Braxton, Ronald Kuivila, Maggi Payne, Butch Rovan, and Todd Winkler.



Tuesday July 1, 2014 18:45 - 19:00
Great Hall Goldsmiths

19:00

Bruno Spoerri - Old socks in new shoes
Old socks in new shoes - improvising with old ideas and new technology.

Since over 40 years saxophonist Bruno Spoerri tries to use electronic instruments and tools for his jazz-oriented improvisations, combining historic concepts with new techniques. Today he is working with MAX/MSP patches, the Synthophone, the Leapmotion and some self-built controllers.

Artists
BS

Bruno Spoerri

Bruno Spoerri is a saxophonist and technologist who creates works for improvising musicians with interactive electronic devices.  He was Co-Director of the Swiss Center for Computer Music and has toured extensively with Joel Chadabe, Joel Vandroogenbroeck, in the USA (Composer's Forum New York, Princeton University, Colgate University, Rensselaer), Canada (McGill University Montreal), India and Africa with the solo program "CAJ... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 19:00 - 19:15
Great Hall Goldsmiths

19:15

Ensemble Fabrique Nomade
Fabrique Nomade is a new electronic chamber music ensemble that seeks to reconnect with the practice, the refined listening, and the intimate nature of “classical” chamber music. 

Contrary to the current way of playing contemporary electronic music, where the sound from the “hyper”-instrumentalists is controlled by a computer specialist in the room, performers in the Fabrique Nomade ensemble control all of their sound productions through their own computers.  

The ensemble currently features Francis Faber (digital instruments), Etienne Graindorge (sound engineer), Martina Rodriguez (cello) and Szuhwa Wu (violin).




Artists
AC

Anne Cartel

Anne Cartel works as a regular guest within prestigious French orchestras which have performed with conductors such as Esa-Pekka SALONEN, Myung Wung CHUNG, Armin JORDAN, Louis LANGREE, Jésus Lopez COBOS, Pascal ROPHE, Arie van BECK, Hervé NIQUET, Tom KOOPMAN, | She also devotes herself to the contemporary repertoire, and has performed a number of World premieres. She is a member of... Read More →
FF

Francis Faber

la grande fabrique
Francis Faber composes, plays and teaches electronic music.  As a composer, he is focusing on real time electronic music and works with Percussions de Strasbourg, Ars Nova, TM+, Puce Muse, Musique Nouvelle, Art Zoyd, Ensemble Orchestral Contemporain…, and for live multimedia, installations, and young audience performances. He plays new digitals instruments ( Méta-Instrument, Wiimote, Karlax…) and leads La Grande Fabrique, a music and... Read More →
TM

Tom Mays

Composer, Teacher, Conservatoire de Strasbourg, Conservatoire de Paris
Tom Mays is a composer and computer musician. His works include electroacoustic pieces, instruments with electronics, music for dance, theater, interactive installation and film. He is currently working on the suite “The Well-tempered Patch” for basic real time processing and solo instruments, and is especially interested in gestural performance of real-time computer systems for the performing arts. He teaches Electroacoustic Composition... Read More →



Tuesday July 1, 2014 19:15 - 19:30
Great Hall Goldsmiths

20:00

[OUT THERE / IN HERE]
Invited artists Leafcutter John and Imogen Heap perform respectively with a tabletop arena of flashing lights and the MiMu gloves.  John’s instruments are all homemade, innovating on the spot as his responsive, searching and otherwordly performances draw us in. 

Imogen Heap gives an early sneak preview of the development of her forthcoming live show.  Imogen will be performing piano and vocals using the latest technology she has been working on, the Mi.Mu gloves.  The gloves enable live processing to be controlled by hand movements and this short set of improvisations will explore some of the musical possibilities of this.

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

LIVE
Leafcutter John
Imogen Heap
Radical 2
Jake Williams
Shawn Greenlee

Tuesday July 1, 2014 20:00 - 22:57
XOYO Shoreditch

20:35

Jake Williams - Chat Room
Chat room

Chat Room will be a live electroacoustic performance made from recorded and live audio streams sourced from internet video chat rooms. The audio will be manipulated using a performance system that uses timecode vinyl as an incredibly tactile, engaging and versatile controller for a wide range of processes. The show will be accompanied by an abstract, provocative improvised dance by two performance artists and the video and audio of the resulting performance will be streamed live back into one of the chat rooms that the audio was sourced from.  Chat Room both presents a development of the turntable as a way of interfacing with music, and the potential of the internet as a unique space for art, rather than just a mass distribution system for more traditional forms. 


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***


Artists
JW

Jake Williams

Jake has worked with many aspects of electronic music over the last 10 years, writing / producing for Warp Records, Lo Recordings, !K7 and Process amongst others, toured extensively as part of live bands and a DJ and has written music and sound design for high-profile television, advertising and award winning short films. Recent projects have included producing the audio aspect of the live realisation of visual artist Dinos Chapman’s... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 20:35 - 21:05
XOYO Shoreditch

21:05

Shawn Greenlee - Emerald Tablets
Emerald Tablets

Emerald Tablets revitalizes discarded interfaces with recent developments in embeddable, single-board computers. Three Wacom UD-II serial tablets dating from 1996 are paired with the BeagleBoard-xM. Together, the three tablets control erratic, feedback-driven synthesis networks and signal mixing procedures.



Artists
SG

Shawn Greenlee

Assistant Professor, Rhode Island School of Design (RISD)
Shawn Greenlee is a composer and sound artist. Greenlee is Assistant Professor at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD); and earned his PhD in Computer Music and New Media at Brown University (2008). Greenlee has performed extensively across the United States and Europe, including Re-new (2013, Copenhagen), ICMC (2011, Huddersfield and 2005, Barcelona), IN TRANSIT (2008, Berlin), and Elevate (2007, Graz), among others. His discography spans... Read More →



Tuesday July 1, 2014 21:05 - 21:35
XOYO Shoreditch

21:35

Radical 2 - Your Fox's, A Dirty Gold
"Your Fox's A Dirty Gold" is an interactive performance piece for a singer with motion sensors, electric guitar, live-electronics and lights. "Fox" is what you could describe as a modern pop song (a love song actually). It incorporates elements of contemporary and experimental electronic music in the domain of pop music.

The concept is to link all involved elements to the movement and gestures of the performer. This allows the singer to control, trigger and shape in time all technical and musical parts of the composition in real time. The software MAX/MSP is used to control the live electronics and the DMX lights. They are driven by the upper body movement of the singer and the electric guitar interface. The aim of this technical concept is to establish an embodiment of the involved electronic apexes of the piece in order to make it perceivable and controllable like a regular acoustic instrument. 

Composed by Alexander Schubert.


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***
 

Artists
DS

Dennis Sullivan

Born in Akron, Ohio, Dennis K Sullivan II is a percussionist, performance artist, composer and educator based in Brooklyn NY. | As an artist, Dennis puts forth a nonpareil product rooted in the intersection of music, theater, and analog electronics.  It is his intent to create a product devoid of genre classification that will appeal to ears of any level. As a percussionist focusing on new and contemporary music, Dennis is a founding member... Read More →


Tuesday July 1, 2014 21:35 - 21:55
XOYO Shoreditch

22:15

Imogen Heap

IMOGEN HEAP


Imogen Heap combines pop success with a constant drive for innovation and experimentation, whether through performing with new technologies or using social networks to change the very dynamics of how she connects and even performs with her audience.

She will let us in on an early sneak preview of the development of her forthcoming live show.  Imogen will be performing piano, vocals and demoing Mi.Mu gloves, her new performance interface.  The gloves enable live processing to be controlled by hand movements and this short set of improvisations will explore some of the musical possibilities of this.


http://imogenheap.com/thegloves/

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

Artists
IH

Imogen Heap

IMOGEN HEAP has been invited by the BEAM festival. | Imogen Heap combines pop success with a constant drive for innovation and experimentation, whether through performing with new technologies or using social networks to change the very dynamics of how she connects and even performs with her audience. | She has recently launched a Kickstarter for The Mi.Mu Gloves project, a new performance interface which she will be performing with for... Read More →



Tuesday July 1, 2014 22:15 - 22:50
XOYO Shoreditch

22:50

Leafcutter John

LEAFCUTTER JOHN


Leafcutter John will be presenting his new light powered synthesiser: an immersive audio visual performance with a thrilling synaesthesic dimension. Bike lights and candles generate glorious landscapes of playful, glitched techno in a performance that is simultaneously accessible and enchanting.


http://leafcutterjohn.com/


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***


Artists
LJ

Leafcutter John

LEAFCUTTER JOHN has been invited by BEAM Festival | | Leafcutter John will be presenting his new light powered synthesiser: an immersive audio visual performance with a thrilling synaesthesic dimension. Bike lights and candles generate glorious landscapes of playful, glitched techno in a performance that is simultaneously accessible and enchanting.


Tuesday July 1, 2014 22:50 - 23:15
XOYO Shoreditch
 
Wednesday, July 2
 

08:30

Conference REGISTRATION
Upon arrival, you should visit the registration desk in the New Academic Building cafe to register and collect your conference bag and programme.  

Registration will be open daily from 8.30am - 2pm.

Wednesday July 2, 2014 08:30 - 14:00
New Academic Building Cafe Ground Floor

09:00

[INSTALLATIONS]
We are excited to present a range of installations from NIME artists and researchers:

Fordham Park

The Pedalling Games (Kaffe Matthews)

New Academic Building, Weston Atrium

Tipping Point (Kathy Hinde)

Acoustic Cluster (Mari Ohno)

DOT, a videogame with no winner (Henrique Roscoe)

s_platters (Freida Abtan)

Quotidian Record (Brian House)

FADE OUT (Paul Destieu)

I am not playing violin (Jasper Fung)

Humming Mississippi (Jesse Allison and Frederick Ostrenko)

Convergence (Jordan Hochenbaum, Owen Vallis and Jasmin Blasco)

New Academic Building, Top Floor

Sense Boxes (Heather Frasch)

The Octopus (Michael Lyons, Haruka Mitani, Palle Dahlstedt and Axel Mulder)

Dirty Tangible Interfaces (Matthieu Savary, Diemo Schwarz, Denis Pellerin, Florence Massin and Roland Cahen)

Colpersys4 (Steve Symons)

New Academic Building, Mezzanines + Atrium

Rwar (Courtney Brown and Sharif Razzaque)

Roboterstück (Arne Eigenfeldt)

Deptford Town Hall

Echo Moiré (Matteo Marangoni)

Electronic Music Studios, Richard Hoggart Building

MirrorFugue (Xiao Xiao and Hiroshi Ishii)
 

Artists
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
AM

Axel Mulder

President, Infusion Systems
May I-CubeX you ?
avatar for Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown is an interactive sound artist, Argentine tango dancer, and computer music researcher. She is a doctoral candidate in Digital Media and Performance at Arizona State University, and a graduate of Dartmouth’s Electroacoustic Master’s Program. A former Fulbright Fellow, she developed interactive Argentine tango dance during her residency in Buenos Aires, Argentina. This on-going project gives dancers agency over music, their... Read More →
avatar for Derick Ostrenko

Derick Ostrenko

Assistant Professor, LSU
Frederick Ostrenko, is a media artist and Assistant Professor at Louisiana State University. He holds a joint ­appointment in the Digital Art concentration at the School of Art and the Cultural Computing research group at the Center for Computation and Technology. Derick creates physical and virtual systems that examine the intersections of media, culture, and technology. Derick received his MFA in Digital+Media from the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
DS

Diemo Schwarz

Diemo Schwarz, born in Germany in 1969, is a researcher and developer at Ircam (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique-Musique, Paris), composer of electronic music, and musician on drums and laptop. | His research work includes improving interaction between musician and computer, and exploiting large masses of sound for interactive real-time sound synthesis, collaborating with composers such as Philippe Manoury, Dai... Read More →
FA

Freida Abtan

Freida Abtan is a Canadian multi-disciplinary artist and composer. Her music falls somewhere in between musique concrete and more modern noise and experimental audio and both genres are influential to her sound. Her work has been compared to bands such as Coil, and Zoviet France, because of her use of spectral manipulation and collage. | Freida primarily works with samples of both musical and non-musical objects that she records herself and then... Read More →
HF

Heather Frasch

HEATHER FRASCH is a sound artist whose work explores the intersection of acoustic & electroacoustic composition, improvisation, interactive performance, new media theory and sound installations. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley where she studied composition with Franck Bedrossian, and interactive electronic music at CNMAT with Edmund Campion & David Wessel. Her music has been performed at festivals and... Read More →
HR

Henrique Roscoe

Henrique Roscoe is a digital artist, musician and designer. Works in the audiovisual area since 2004. Has a conceptual and generative project called ‘HOL’. All the compositions seek a correspondence between audio and video and they are performed live or in the form of videos or installations.  Makes part of the audiovisual duo ‘ligalingha’. Develops interactive installations, programming in Processing, vvvv and... Read More →
HI

Hiroshi Ishii

Associate Director, MIT Media Lab
Where the sea meets the land, life has blossomed into a myriad of unique forms in the turbulence of water, sand, and wind. At another seashore between the land of atoms and the sea of bits, we are now facing the challenge of reconciling our dual citizenships in the physical and digital worlds. Windows to the digital world are confined to flat square screens and pixels, or "painted bits." Unfortunately, one can not feel and confirm the virtual... Read More →
HB

House, Brian

Brown University|Providence|RI|USA
Brian House is a media artist whose work traverses alternative geographies, experimental music, and a critical data practice. He is interested in the contingent qualities of information and how we experience time in network culture. By constructing embodied, participatory systems, he seeks to negotiate between algorithms and the rhythms of everyday life. | | Currently, Brian teaches in the Digital + Media program at the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
JB

Jasmin Blasco

Jasmin Blasco is a French/American artist living in Los Angeles CA. | Trained in Music Technology at the California Institute of the Arts, he is interested in the narrative and sculptural aspects of sound. | He is developing an investigative and exploratory practice over a variety of media in which research and collaboration play a fundamental role. | | In 2013 he launched The NOISE INDEX, a collaborative research platform to explore... Read More →
JF

Jasper Fung

Jasper Fung (b.1988) is a Hong Kong based media artist, performer and musician. His work intertwines installation, music and sonic composition that significantly arouse introspection into today’s discourteous and coarse world alongside the rapid elimination of social interactiveness. Fung’s work explores the terrain over classical, alternative, sound and space, rooted in his determination to challenge any models of traditional... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Allison

Jesse Allison

Experimental Music & Digital Media, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|United States
Jesse Allison is a professor at LSU in Experiment Music & Digital Media. As part of the AVATAR initiative, he is actively performing research and collaboration into ways that technology can expand what is possible in the arts. As an artist, Allison has disseminated works and research around the globe through live performance art, interactive installations, virtual and hybrid worlds installations, and paper presentations. Allison received his... Read More →
JH

Jordan Hochenbaum

Jordan Natan Hochenbaum is an artist concerned with finding meaningful connections between music, art, and technology. Currently, his work involves designing novel interfaces for expressive user interaction and musical performance, multimodal sensor systems, and playing and composing in a wide range of musical genres, from electronic music to North Indian classical. As a musician, Jordan actively releases music under the Natan H moniker. As... Read More →
KM

Kaffe Matthews

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project... Read More →
MM

Matteo Marangoni

Matteo Marangoni is a DIY enthusiast that operates at the margins of various artistic disciplines. His practice investigates the perception of space and the subject-object dichotomy through processes that articulate the real within idiosyncratic rituals. He is a founding member of the artist collective iii, curates the nomadic performance series “No Patent Pending” and writes about self-made performative media on Neural... Read More →
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →
OV

Owen Vallis

Owen Vallis is a musician and artist interested in performance, sound, and technology. As a co-founder of Flipmu, Owen explores a diverse range of projects including producing other musicians, composing his own music, building audio processors, and designing new hardware interfaces for musical performance. Having lived in Toronto, Canada, Wellington, New Zealand, San Francisco, Nashville, and Los Angeles, Owen has been able to develop a broad and... Read More →
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  
PD

Paul Destieu

Paul Destieu lives and works in Marseille, France. | His researches question tech­nology and its impact on our envi­ronment. His work exa­mines the situation of machines within our society noti­ceably fed by the history of media. He uses cali­bration, syn­chro­ni­zation pro­cesses or setup confi­gu­ra­tions as many means for art pro­duction. His art pro­duction focuses on the virtual and... Read More →
SS

Steve Symons

Steve is a sound artist known for an innovative series of sonic augmented reality projects titled 'aura', more recently his 'Gigzine' project exploring mass-interaction at music events and as a member of the award winning Owl Project. He creates digital systems for his own use, which are often released as free and open-source tools via his muio.org ltd consultancy. | | Owl Project is a three person collaboration (Steve Symons, Simon... Read More →


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:00 - 18:00
Various Locations Golsmiths

09:30

[SESSION 6] MUSICAL INTERACTION DESIGN
Session on Musical Interaction Design

Session chair: Rebecca Fiebrink 

Moderators
Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:54
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

Manhattan: End-User Programming for Music
Manhattan: End-User Programming for Music
Chris Nash
University of the West of England

Long Paper

This paper explores the concept of end-user programming languages in music composition, and introduces the Manhattan system, which integrates formulas with a grid-based style of music sequencer. Following the paradigm of spreadsheets, an established model of end-user programming, Manhattan is designed to bridge the gap between traditional music editing methods (such as MIDI sequencing and typesetting) and generative and algorithmic music – seeking both to reduce the learning threshold of programming and support flexible integration of static and dynamic musical elements in a single work. Interaction draws on rudimentary knowledge of mathematics and spreadsheets to augment the sequencer notation with programming concepts such as expressions, built-in functions, variables, pointers and arrays, iteration (for loops), branching (goto), and conditional statements (if-then-else). In contrast to other programming tools, formulas emphasise the visibility of musical data (e.g. notes), rather than code, but also allow composers to interact with notated music from a more abstract perspective of musical processes. To illustrate the function and use cases of the system, several examples of traditional and generative music are provided, the latter drawing on minimalism (process-based music) as an accessible introduction to algorithmic composition. Throughout, the system and approach are evaluated using the cognitive dimensions of notations framework, together with early feedback for use by artists.

Authors
CN

Chris Nash

Senior Lecturer in Music Technology, University of the West of England|Bristol||United Kingdom
Chris Nash is a professional programmer and composer, and currently Senior Lecturer in Music Technology (Soft ware Development for Audio, Sound, and Music) at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol, UK). He completed his PhD on music HCI at the University of Cambridge, looking at theoretical and analytical methods for modeling and designing interfaces for composition, supported by a longitudinal study of over 1,000 DAW users... Read More →


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:55
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

The Divergent Interface: Supporting Creative Exploration of Parameter Spaces
The Divergent Interface: Supporting Creative Exploration of Parameter Spaces
Robert Tubb and Simon Dixon
Queen Mary University of London

Long Paper

This paper outlines a theoretical framework for creative technology based on two contrasting processes: divergent exploration and convergent optimisation. We claim that these two cases require different gesture-to-parameter mapping properties. Results are presented from a user experiment that motivates this theory. The experiment was conducted using a publicly available iPad app: ``Sonic Zoom''. Participants were encouraged to conduct an open ended exploration of synthesis timbre using a combination of two different interfaces. The first was a standard interface with ten sliders, hypothesised to be suited to the ``convergent'' stage of creation. The second was a mapping of the entire 10-D combinatorial space to a 2-D surface using a space filling curve. This novel interface was intended to support the ``divergent'' aspect of creativity. The paths of around 250 users through both 2-D and 10-D space were logged and analysed. Both the interaction data and questionnaire results show that the different interfaces tended to be used for different aspects of sound creation, and a combination of these two navigation styles was deemed to be more useful than either individually. The study indicates that the predictable, separate parameters found in most music technology are more appropriate for convergent tasks.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:56
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

A Methodological Framework for Teaching, Evaluating and Informing NIME Design with a Focus on Mapping and Expressiveness
A Methodological Framework for Teaching, Evaluating and Informing NIME Design with a Focus on Mapping and Expressiveness
Sebastian Mealla and Sergi Jordà
Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Long Paper

The maturation process of the NIME field has brought a growing interest in teaching the design and implementa- tion of Digital Music Instruments (DMI) as well as in find- ing objective evaluation methods to assess the suitability of these outcomes. In this paper we propose a methodology for teaching NIME design and a set of tools meant to inform the design process. This approach has been applied in a master course focused on the exploration of expressiveness and on the role of the mapping component in the NIME cre- ation chain, through hands-on and self-reflective approach based on a restrictive setup consisting of smart-phones and the Pd programming language. Working Groups were formed, and a 2-step DMI design process was applied, including 2 performance stages. The evaluation tools assessed both System and Performance as- pects of each project, according to Listeners’ impressions after each performance. Listeners’ previous music knowl- edge was also considered. Through this methodology, stu- dents with different backgrounds were able to effectively engage in the NIME design processes, developing working DMI prototypes according to the demanded requirements; the assessment tools proved to be consistent for evaluating NIMEs systems and performances, and the fact of inform- ing the design processes with the outcome of the evaluation, showed a traceable progress in the students outcomes.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:57
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

Rapid Creation and Publication of Digital Musical Instruments
Rapid Creation and Publication of Digital Musical Instruments
Charlie Roberts, Matthew Wright, JoAnn Kuchera-Morin, Tobias Hollerer
UC Santa Barbara, UCSB, University of California, Santa Barbara,

Short Paper

We describe research enabling the rapid creation of digital musical instruments and their publication to the Internet. This research comprises both high-level abstractions for making continuous mappings between audio, interactive, and graphical elements, as well as a centralized database for storing and accessing instruments. Published instruments run in devices capable of running a modern web browser. Notation of instrument design is considered and optimized for readability, expressivity and simplicity.

Authors
CR

Charlie Roberts

Charlie Roberts is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the AlloSphere Research Group at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research focuses on human-computer interaction in virtual reality and creative coding environments. He is the primary developer of the creative coding environment Gibber, with which he regularly performs. Charlie is currently funded through a generous fellowship from the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:58
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

TrAP: An Interactive System to Generate Valid Raga Phrases from Sound-Tracings
TrAP: An Interactive System to Generate Valid Raga Phrases from Sound-Tracings
Udit Roy, Tejaswinee Kelkar, Bipin Indurkhya
IIIT Hyderabad

Short Paper

We propose a new musical interface, TrAP (TRace-A-Phrase) for generating phrases of Hindustani Classical Music (HCM). In this system the user traces melodic phrases on a tablet interface to create phrases in a raga. We begin by analyzing tracings drawn by 28 participants, and train a classifier to categorize them into one of four melodic categories from the theory of Hindustani Music. Then we create a model based on note transitions from the raga grammar for the notes used in the singable octaves in HCM. Upon being given a new tracing, the system segments the tracing and computes a final phrase that best approximates the tracing.

Authors
TK

Tejaswinee Kelkar

Masters Student, IIIT Hyderabad
I am a masters student at Cognitive Science Lab, IIIT-Hyderabad. My advisor is Prof Bipin Indurkhya. My research interests are multimodality and spatial metaphors in improvised musical performance. I focus on gestures and spatial imagery in Hindustani music, and how to use these to facilitate learning and notation of music. I have a bachelors degree in Industrial Engineering from Nagpur University, India. I also hold a bachelors diploma in... Read More →
UR

Udit Roy

Graduate Student, IIIT Hyderabad
I am a graduate student enrolled in MS programme at International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad, India. My primary interests lie in computer vision and machine learning related challenges. I am also deeply interested in music and cognition based domain.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 10:59
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

Rich Contacts: Corpus-Based Convolution of Contact Interaction Sound for Enhanced Musical Expression
Rich Contacts: Corpus-Based Convolution of Contact Interaction Sound for Enhanced Musical Expression
Diemo Schwarz, Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, Alex Harker
Ircam, CERENEM

Short Paper

Contact gestures are an intuitive way to express musical rhythm and dynamics on any surface or object by hitting, scratching, strumming. It is striking to observe how easily one can express a dynamic rhythm by table-drumming, the hands giving a range of timbres using the fingernails, fingertips, knuckles, thumb ball.

Authors
DS

Diemo Schwarz

Diemo Schwarz, born in Germany in 1969, is a researcher and developer at Ircam (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique-Musique, Paris), composer of electronic music, and musician on drums and laptop. | His research work includes improving interaction between musician and computer, and exploiting large masses of sound for interactive real-time sound synthesis, collaborating with composers such as Philippe Manoury, Dai... Read More →
avatar for Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Professor of Composition and Improvisation, University of Huddersfield


Wednesday July 2, 2014 09:30 - 11:00
New Academic Building: LG02

11:00

Dennis Van Tilburg - Musique Parabolique
Musique Parabolique

Armed with parabolic microphone and live sampling system Dennis van Tilburg takes his audience with wireless headphones on an auditory journey. During a walk through the neighbourhood he catches snatches of street scenes and mixes it live to a composition that manipulates reality. The show evokes associations with spy movies and defies the boundaries of privacy in public spaces when unsolicited outsiders become part of the performance. At unexpected moments it makes our experience eerie, surreal or absurdist.



Artists
DV

Dennis van Tilburg

www.dennisvantilburg.nl
 Musician and sound artist Dennis van Tilburg (1975) operates on the border where music disintegrates into chunks and where apparent loose sounds unexpectedly form wonderful music. He is always looking for new techniques to create an idiosyncratic sound palette. For Musique Parabolique Dennis finds inspiration in the ‘musique concrète’ from the forties and fifties of the last century.



Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:00 - 11:30
310NXRd 310 New Cross Road

11:00

Break
Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:00 - 11:30
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

[SESSION 7] NETWORKED WIRELESS SYSTEMS
Session on Networked, Wireless Systems

Session chair: Georg Essl 

Moderators
Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 12:54
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Making the Most of Wi-Fi: Optimisations for Robust Wireless Live Music Performance
Making the Most of Wi-Fi: Optimisations for Robust Wireless Live Music Performance
Thomas Mitchell, Sebastian Madgwick, Simon Rankine, Geoffrey Hilton, Adrian Freed, Andrew Nix
University of the West of England, University of Bristol, CNMAT UC Berkeley

Long Paper


Wireless technology is growing increasingly prevalent in the development of new interfaces for live music performance. However, with a number of different wireless technologies operating in the 2.4 GHz band, there is a high risk of interference and congestion, which has the potential to severely disrupt live performances. With its high transmission power, channel bandwidth and throughput, Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11) presents an opportunity for highly robust wireless communications. This paper presents our preliminary work optimising the components of a Wi-Fi system for live performance scenarios. We summarise the manufacture and testing of a prototype directional antenna that is designed to maximise sensitivity to a performer's signal while suppressing interference from elsewhere. We also propose a set of recommended Wi-Fi configurations to reduce latency and increase throughput. Practical investigations utilising these arrangements demonstrate a single x-OSC device achieving a latency of <3 ms and a distributed network of 15 devices achieving a net throughput of ∼4800 packets per second (∼320 per device); where each packet is a 104-byte OSC message containing 16 analogue input channels acquired by the device.

Authors
AN

Andrew Nix

University of Bristol
SR

Simon Rankine

Undergraduate Student, University of Bristol


Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 12:55
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Simplified Expressive Mobile Development with NexusUI, NexusUp, and NexusDrop
Simplified Expressive Mobile Development with NexusUI, NexusUp, and NexusDrop
Benjamin Taylor, Jesse Allison, Daniel Holmes, William Conlin, Yemin Oh
Louisiana State University

Long Paper

Developing for mobile and multimodal platforms is more important now than ever, as smartphones and tablets proliferate and mobile device orchestras become commonplace. We detail NexusUI, a JavaScript framework that enables rapid prototyping and development of expressive multitouch electronic instrument interfaces within a web browser.

Authors
avatar for Jesse Allison

Jesse Allison

Experimental Music & Digital Media, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|United States
Jesse Allison is a professor at LSU in Experiment Music & Digital Media. As part of the AVATAR initiative, he is actively performing research and collaboration into ways that technology can expand what is possible in the arts. As an artist, Allison has disseminated works and research around the globe through live performance art, interactive installations, virtual and hybrid worlds installations, and paper presentations. Allison received his... Read More →
avatar for William Conlin

William Conlin

PHD Student, Experimental Music and Digital Media at Louisiana State University
William Walker Conlin is a composer, saxophonist and media technologist. Conlin works to explore all facets of electro-acoustic music through improvisation, computer programming, and design. Conlin has written music for laptop orchestra, fixed media, video, interactive installations, art collaborations and more. In 2013 he presented at the inaugural TEDxLSU with his friend and colleague Nick Hwang.
DH

Daniel Holmes

Experimental Music and Digital Media, Louisiana State University
Danny Holmes earned his BM in Classical Guitar and his MM in Composition. He taught guitar and music theory in Tuscaloosa for several years before moving back to Louisiana. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Experimental Music and Digital Media at Louisiana State University, where he has since co-founded the EMDM Academy with Dr. Jesse Allison. EMDM Academy is a community outreach bringing electronic music in all forms to students in the Baton... Read More →
avatar for Yemin Oh

Yemin Oh

Experimental Music and Digital Media in Louisiana State University
Composer/Multimedia Artist/ | Yemin Oh is a composer who is always looking for fascinating and captivating music. His main interests lie in several area including acoustic composition, visual music, electro-acoustic composition and interactive multi-media work. His pieces incorporate his aesthetic aim into blending visual elements, and live electronics. He have Ph.D in Experimental Music & Digital Media at Louisiana State University... Read More →
avatar for Ben Taylor

Ben Taylor

Louisiana State University
Net Art, Web Audio, Networks, Contemporary Art, Creative Code


Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 12:56
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Communication, Control, and State Sharing in Collaborative Live Coding
Communication, Control, and State Sharing in Collaborative Live Coding
Sang Won Lee and Georg Essl
University of Michigan

Long Paper

In the setting of collaborative live coding, a number of issues emerge: (1) need for communication, (2) issues of conflicts in sharing program state space, and (3) remote control of code execution. In this paper, we propose solutions to these problems. In the recent extension of UrMus, a programming environment for mobile music application development, we introduce a paradigm of shared and individual namespaces safeguard against conflicts in parallel coding activities. We also develop live variable view that communicates live changes in state among live coders, networked performers, and the audience. Lastly, we integrate collaborative aspects of programming execution into built-in live chat, which enables not only communication with others, but also distributed execution of code.

Authors
avatar for Sang Won Lee

Sang Won Lee

PhD Candidate., University of Michigan|Ann Arbor|Michigan|United States


Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 12:57
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

A Simple Architecture for Server-based (Indoor) Audio Walks
A Simple Architecture for Server-based (Indoor) Audio Walks
Thomas Resch and Matthias Krebs
Research Fellow, University of Music Basel, Research Fellow, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland

Short Paper

The submitted paper proposes a simple architecture for creating (indoor) audio walks/games by using a server running Max/MSP together with the external object fhnw.audiowalk.state and smartphone clients running either under Android or iOS using LibPd. Server and smartphone clients communicate over WLAN by exchanging OSC messages. Server and client have been designed in a way that allows artists with only little programming skills to create position-based audio walks. The source code of both, the Max/MSP object including help files for the setup and the Android application are available at Github as open source software.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 12:58
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Ping-Pong: Musically Discovering Locations
Ping-Pong: Musically Discovering Locations
Hyung Suk Kim, Jorge Herrera, Ge Wang
CCRMA

Short Paper

A recently developed system that uses pitched sounds to discover relative 3D positions of a group of devices located in the same physical space is described. The measurements are coordinated over an IP network in a decentralized manner, while the actual measurements are carried out measuring the time-of-flight of the notes played by different devices.

Authors
GW

Ge Wang

Assistant Professor, Stanford University|Stanford|CA|United States


Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 12:59
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

CloudOrch: A Portable SoundCard in the Cloud
CloudOrch: A Portable SoundCard in the Cloud
Abram Hindle
University of Alberta

Short Paper

One problem with live computer music performance is the transport of computers to a venue and the following setup of the computers used in playing and rendering music. The more computers involved the longer the setup and tear-down of a performance. Each computer adds power and cabling requirements that the venue must accommodate. Cloud computing can change of all this by simplifying the setup of many (10s, 100s) of machines at the click of a button. But there's a catch, the cloud is not physically near you, you cannot run an audio cable to the cloud. The audio from a computer music instrument in the cloud needs to streamed back to the performer and listeners. There are many solutions for streaming audio over networks and the internet, most of them suffer from high latency, heavy buffering, or proprietary/non-portable clients. In this paper we propose a portable cloud-friendly method of streaming, almost a cloud soundcard, whereby performers can use mobile devices (Android, iOS, laptops) to stream audio from the cloud with far lower latency than technologies like icecast. This technology enables near-realtime control over power computer music networks enabling performers to travel light and perform live with more computers than ever before.

Authors

Wednesday July 2, 2014 11:30 - 13:00
New Academic Building: LG02

13:00

Lunch
All registrants receive a catered lunch. There will be several stations set up across the New Academic Building so that your don't have to queue too much. 

Wednesday July 2, 2014 13:00 - 14:00
New Academic Building Cafe Ground Floor

13:00

[BEAM@NIME: Kaffe Matthews - The Pedalling Games]
The Pedalling Games is a suite of interactive sonic bike pieces made for Fordham Park to be played by passing audience. Created using a brand new system developed by the BRI and explored with workshop participants at the NIME conference, park visitors can come cycle a bike in and around the park, making music dependant on how and where they go and how near or far they move from other sonic cyclists.

Solo or grouped, the 13 sonic bikes behave differently, some as synths, some as locative sample players, but all as instruments, sonically sensitive to the presence and absence of each other as the shape and size of the group and the decisions and actions of the performing cyclists constantly shifts. Moment by moment new music will be made by the audience through cycling.

The Bicrophonic Research Institute (BRI) is an association that researches and collaborates to make and share music from bicycles by pedalling through landscapes alone or together. Through ten years of international projects, the BRI has developed the sonic bike which plays music that changes dependant on where and how fast the cyclist goes through a pair of bike-mounted speakers and bespoke software to GPS system, the cyclist becoming the performer and the passers by audience. Established by Kaffe Matthews and Dave Griffiths in 2014, the BRI's collaborators for this piece include George Haworth and Lyubo Popomov.                                                                                    

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project music for bodies. Her 2004 collaboration Weightless Animals was awarded a BAFTA, she received a NESTA Dreamtime Fellowship in 2005 and an Award of Distinction, Prix Ars Electronica 2006 for the work Sonic Bed_London. In February 2006 she was made an Honorary Professor of Music, Shanghai Music Conservatory, China and in 2009, a patron of the Galapagos shark conservation society.

Artists
KM

Kaffe Matthews

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project... Read More →



Wednesday July 2, 2014 13:00 - 18:00
Fordham Park

13:30

[Lunch NIME]
Any lunch is improved by novel displays of sonic interaction. We will be using the cinema space on Goldsmiths campus to show a range of acts from live coding, music generated with facial expressions and one very big tail.

Almost Human
Ian Hattwick, Seth Woods, Marcelo Wanderley and Philip Thomas

Origami

Martin Marier and Myriam Beau

Performance Trio Brachiale

Alberto de Campo, Hannes Hoelzl and Dominik Hildebrand Marques Lopes

Whitechapel Development

Sarah Angliss and Stephen Hiscock

Two-Seater
Noa Dolberg, Lior Lerman, Maya Pik and Gosha Shtasel

Wezen - Gewording

Marije Baalman

The Dark Interpreter

Martin Howse
 

Wednesday July 2, 2014 13:30 - 14:59
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

13:31

Ian Hattwick and Seth Woods - Almost Human
Almost Human

“Almost Human” describes a hybrid performance of cello and prosthetic digital instrument. Cellist/mover/researcher Seth Woods is interested in the analysis of the instrumental ges- tures used in cello performance and the use of this analysis both for pedagogy and as material for the development of an extended personal gestural repertoire. This composition by Ian Hattwick for prosthetic instruments, cello and electronics is informed by extensive work with dancers, and Woods’ behavioural and physical gestures. In this composition Woods uses the cello to provide the prosthetic instruments with both sonic material and gestural inspiration. “Almost Human” demonstrates a multitude of instrumental possibilities for both instruments, questions the idea of sonic affectivity, and explores areas of choreographic processes and instrumental gestures.

Artists
IH

Ian Hattwick

Ian Hattwick (Instrument Design) is a composer, performer, and digital musical instrument designer. His current research focuses on collaborative approaches to music performance using gestural interfaces. In 2013 he co-created the Prosthetic Instruments, family of gestural controllers in- tended to be worn by dancers, for which he composed and presented two compositions at the Cacoyannis Institute in Athens, Greece. He holds an MFA from the... Read More →
avatar for Seth Woods

Seth Woods

Cellist Seth Woods has established a reputation as a versatile artist straddling several genres. While being classically trained, he has been seen in a variety of musical settings ranging from Baroque performance to avant-garde new music and has graced such diverse stages as Carnegie Hall, La Scala, Radio City Music Hall and the Bell Centre. Mr. Woods was the cello soloist for two new works created with the Staatsballett Berlin and the Ballett... Read More →



Wednesday July 2, 2014 13:31 - 13:41
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

13:40

Martin Marier and Myriam Bleau - Origami
  Origami is a partially improvised work about folding, unfolding and
  foldover.  Both performers play the sponge, a cushion-like interface
  that sends sensor data wirelessly to the SuperCollider environment.

  The piece was composed by Martin Marier and Myriam Bleau during
  improvisation sessions, slowly fixing a structure while exploring the
  possibilities of the instrument.

Artists
MM

Martin Marier

Martin Marier is a composer and a performer who is mainly interested in live electronic music using new interfaces.  He is the inventor of the sponge, a cushion like musical interface he uses to perform his pieces. The main goal of this approach is to establish a natural link between gesture and sound in electronic music. He aims at improving the interaction with the audience and at making the process of composing more playful. His... Read More →
MB

Myriam Bleau

Montreal native Myriam Bleau is a composer, multimedia artist an performer. Exploring the limits between musical performance and digital arts, she creates audiovisual systems that go beyond the screen, such as sound installations and performance-specific musical interfaces. Her presence on the popular music scene influence her hybrid electronic practice that integrates hip hop, techno, experimental and pop elements.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 13:40 - 13:50
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

13:50

'Performance Trio Brachiale'
"Performance Trio Brachiale" 

Can one improvise with computers and electronics in lively, expressive, complex ways, change directions instantly, and communicate within a common flow? Trio Brachiale likes to think: yes! They have bred their soft- and hardware in a direction that allows for spontaneity like traditional instrumentalists are used to. Add all the surprises the computers can offer as an intelligent music partner. Navigating this space of possibility becomes a breathtaking cybernetic endeavor; the band name roughly indicates what the result will sound like.



Artists
AD

Alberto de Campo

Alberto de Campo is a musician, composer, and Professor for Generative Art / Computational Art at the Institute for time based media at the Berlin University of the Arts. 
He studied classical composition with Andrej Dobrowolski, Georg Haas, and Beat Furrer, at Music University Graz; Jazz guitar with Adelhard Roidinger and Peter O’Mara at Brickner Concervatory Linz; and electronic music with Curtis Roads and Stephen Travis Pope at UC... Read More →
DH

Dominik Hildebrand Marques Lopes

Dominik Hildebrand Marques Lopes studied audio engineering at the Institute for Music and Media Düsseldorf and Arts and Media at the University of the Arts (UdK) Berlin, focusing on multichannel sound installations, improvised electronic music, building kinetic/cybernetic (sound-)objects, musical recording, and live-coding. He is a researcher at UdK Berlin (“Design, Development and Dissemination of New Musical Instruments”) and... Read More →
HH

Hannes Hoelzl

Hannes Hoelzl has worked at STEIM Amsterdam/NL, (Studio for Electro-Instrumental Music), Praktikum Sensortechnik und Live-Sampling
HKU Hogeschool voor de Kunsten Utrecht/NL, Studium
Technische Universität und Musikhochschule Graz/A, Studium Toningenieur. Fakultät Kunst, Media en Technologie.



Wednesday July 2, 2014 13:50 - 14:00
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

14:05

Sarah Angliss and Stephen Hiscock - Whitechapel Development
Whitechapel Development 

Whitechapel Development is an introspective, live duet for theremin and augmented handbells. Percussionists have always exploited damping and movement to shape the long tail of a bell strike (for instance by creating Doppler shift). Here, bells have been fitted with real-time orientation and proximity sensors so their sounds can be manipulated further - their long tail becomes as malleable as the sustained notes of a theremin (their sound is processed using Max/MSP). As the players swap gestures to control their own and each others' sounds, these two disparate instruments become strangely and closely coupled to one another, both sonically and gesturally, to mesmerising effect. The piece is performed and devised by Sarah Angliss and Stephen Hiscock.

 

 



Artists
SA

Sarah Angliss

A composer, performer and sound historian, Sarah Angliss taps into her obsessions with scientific oddities, obsolete machines, faded variety acts and the darkest European folk tales to create her work. | Sarah’s music mixes her own software patches (using Max/MSP, Supercollider, PRAAT and other tools) with her samples, field recordings and live performance on theremin, saw, recorder, waterphone, keyboard,  handbells and other... Read More →
SH

Stephen Hiscock

Stephen Hiscock, percussionist and composer, is a founder member of innovative chamber group EnsembleBash. He’s been a guest musician for Stewart Copeland. Nitin Sawhney and Steve Reich and has collaborated with Joanna MacGregor, Evelyn Glennie, Django Bates and many others. He’s currently working with Complicite and The Globe. He’s been performing with Sarah Angliss for three years.



Wednesday July 2, 2014 14:05 - 14:20
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

14:20

Noa Dolberg, Gosha Shtasel, Lior Lerman and Maya Pik - Two-Seater
Two-Seater

Created by Noa Dolberg, Lior Lerman, Maya Pik and Gosha Shtasel

Two-Seater is a sound play written for two rocking chairs and two faces. The use of face detection software and multiple sound inputs and sensors connected to the furniture to the performers themselves, enabling them to disassociate their features and expressions from the sound of their own voices. This alienation extends itself to the central character in the play whose voice is usurped by the words and thoughts of other people. 

Sitting in her empty house she listens for the sounds of people who might or might not come. In her anxiety she anthropomorphizes the fixtures and fittings of her house, endowing them with the voices of her immediate family. She stages imagined conversations which she will later mistake for real events.

Artists
avatar for Noa Dolberg

Noa Dolberg

Lead Product Designer, Gallagher & Associates
Noa Dolberg is a media artist and a designer whose work touches visual design and code, sound, electronics and fabrication, often integrated into installation pieces. | | Noa’s work has been lately shown at the EPFL+ECAL Lab (Switzerland); London Design Festival; Aronson Galleries (NY); Swissnex (SF), SXSW Festival Austin (TX); The Ammerman Center for Arts and Technology's 14th Biennial (CT), Mana Contemporary (IL), NYC Media Lab (NY... Read More →



Wednesday July 2, 2014 14:20 - 14:30
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

14:30

Marije Baalman - Wezen - Gewording
Wezen – Gewording

Wezen is a solo music-theatre work which explores the relationship between theatrical gesture and musical instrument, between the body and the sonic world. Gewording (Becoming) is the first performance version where the link between physical and sonic gesture is explored during a live performance, combining movement of the body and live coding.

Artists
MB

Marije Baalman

Marije Baalman is an artist and researcher/developer working in the field of interactive sound art. She has a diverse background in physics, sound and sensor technologies, and has worked in the field of interactive sound art, making installations and performances (dance/music). She is currently based at STEIM.



Wednesday July 2, 2014 14:30 - 14:40
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

14:40

Martin Howse - The Dark Interpreter
The Dark Interpreter

Oh, eternity with outstretched wings, that broodest over the secret truths in whose roots lie the mysteries of manhis whence, his whitherhave I searched thee, and struck a right key on thy dreadful organ! - Thomas de Quincey. The Dark Interpreter

The Dark Interpreter is an open source analogue/digital instrument which returns code as contagion (technology) to the skin. Voltage fluctuations on the skin generate and steer software for granular synthesis. It is based on the ARM platform with 16 bit sampling.

Artists
MH

Martin Howse

Programmer, writer, performer and explorer Martin Howse is occupied with the question of where exactly software or code executes. He has collaborated on open-laboratory style projects and performed, lectured and exhibited worldwide.



Wednesday July 2, 2014 14:40 - 14:50
Deptford Town Hall Goldsmiths

15:30

[SESSION 8] MACHINE LEARNING APPLIED
Session on Machine Learning Applied

Session chair: Baptiste Caramiaux 

Moderators
BC

Baptiste Caramiaux

Research Associate, Goldsmiths, University of London
Researcher, Baptiste Caramiaux is currently working at Goldsmiths, University of London. His work focuses on Human Motion, Interaction Design, Sound, Perception and Computational Systems. He received a PhD in acoustic, signal processing and computer science applied to music from University Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), in December 2011. He completed his PhD at IRCAM – Centre Pompidou, in Paris, France. His research at IRCAM examined the... Read More →

Wednesday July 2, 2014 15:30 - 16:39
New Academic Building: LG02

15:30

AudioQuilt: 2D Arrangements of Audio Samples using Metric Learning and Kernelized Sorting
AudioQuilt: 2D Arrangements of Audio Samples using Metric Learning and Kernelized Sorting
Ohad Fried, Zeyu Jin, Reid Oda, Adam Finkelstein
Princeton University

Long Paper

The modern musician enjoys access to a staggering number of audio samples. Composition software can ship with many gigabytes of data, and there are many more to be found online. However, conventional methods for navigating these libraries are still quite rudimentary, and often involve scrolling through alphabetical lists. We present a system for sample exploration that allows audio clips to be sorted according to user taste, and arranged in any desired 2D formation such that similar samples are located near each other. Our method relies on two advances in machine learning. First, metric learning allows the user to shape the audio feature space to match their own preferences. Second, kernelized sorting finds an optimal arrangement for the samples in 2D. We demonstrate our system with two new interfaces for exploring audio samples, and evaluate the technology qualitatively and quantitatively via a pair of user studies.

Authors
AF

Adam Finkelstein

Professor, Princeton University


Wednesday July 2, 2014 15:30 - 16:40
New Academic Building: LG02

15:30

Probabilistic Models for Designing Motion and Sound Relationships
Probabilistic Models for Designing Motion and Sound Relationships
Jules Françoise, Norbert Schnell, Riccardo Borghesi, Frédéric Bevilacqua
IRCAM,

Long Paper

We present a set of probabilistic models that support the design of movement and sound relationships in interactive sonic systems. We focus on a mapping--by--demonstration approach in which the relationships between motion and sound are defined by a machine learning model that learns from a set of user examples. We describe four probabilistic models with complementary characteristics in terms of multimodality and temporality. We illustrate the practical use of each of the four models with a prototype application for sound control built using our Max implementation.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 15:30 - 16:41
New Academic Building: LG02

15:30

Musical Instrument Mapping Design with Echo State Networks
Musical Instrument Mapping Design with Echo State Networks
Chris Kiefer
Goldsmiths College, University of London

Long Paper

Echo State Networks (ESNs), a form of recurrent neural network developed in the field of Reservoir Computing, show significant potential for use as a tool in the design of mappings for digital musical instruments. They have, however, seldom been used in this area, so this paper explores their possible uses. This project contributes a new open source library, which was developed to allow ESNs to run in the Pure Data dataflow environment. Several use cases were explored, focusing on addressing current issues in mapping research. ESNs were found to work successfully in scenarios of pattern classification, multiparametric control, explorative mapping and the design of nonlinearities and uncontrol. \emph{Un-trained} behaviours are proposed, as augmentations to the conventional reservoir system that allow the player to introduce potentially interesting non-linearities and uncontrol into the reservoir. Interactive evolution style controls are proposed as strategies to help design these behaviours, which are otherwise dependent on arbitrary parameters. A study on sound classification shows that ESNs can reliably differentiate between two drum sounds, and also generalise to other similar input. Following evaluation of the use cases, heuristics are proposed to aid the use of ESNs in computer music scenarios.

Authors
CK

Chris Kiefer

Researcher, Goldsmiths


Wednesday July 2, 2014 15:30 - 16:42
New Academic Building: LG02

15:30

Funky Sole Music: Gait Recognition and Adaptive Mapping
Funky Sole Music: Gait Recognition and Adaptive Mapping
Kristian Nymoen, Sichao Song, Yngve Hafting, Jim Torresen
University of Oslo

Short Paper

We present Funky Sole Music, a musical interface employing a sole embedded with three force sensitive resistors in combination with a novel algorithm for continuous movement classification. A heuristics-based music engine has been implemented, allowing users to control high-level parameters of the musical output. This provides a greater degree of control to users without musical expertise compared to what they get with traditional media playes. By using the movement classification result not as a direct control action in itself, but as a way to change mapping spaces and musical sections, the control possibilities offered by the simple interface are greatly increased.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 15:30 - 16:43
New Academic Building: LG02

16:00

Dennis Van Tilburg - Musique Parabolique
Musique Parabolique

Armed with parabolic microphone and live sampling system Dennis van Tilburg takes his audience with wireless headphones on an auditory journey. During a walk through the neighbourhood he catches snatches of street scenes and mixes it live to a composition that manipulates reality. The show evokes associations with spy movies and defies the boundaries of privacy in public spaces when unsolicited outsiders become part of the performance. At unexpected moments it makes our experience eerie, surreal or absurdist.



Artists
DV

Dennis van Tilburg

www.dennisvantilburg.nl
 Musician and sound artist Dennis van Tilburg (1975) operates on the border where music disintegrates into chunks and where apparent loose sounds unexpectedly form wonderful music. He is always looking for new techniques to create an idiosyncratic sound palette. For Musique Parabolique Dennis finds inspiration in the ‘musique concrète’ from the forties and fifties of the last century.



Wednesday July 2, 2014 16:00 - 16:30
310NXRd 310 New Cross Road

16:30

[SESSION 9] DEMOS
CollideFx: A Physics-Based Audio Effects Processor
Chet Gnegy
Stanford University

Evaluating the Perceived Similarity Between Audio-Visual Features Using Corpus-Based Concatenative Synthesis
Augoustinos Tsiros 
Edinburgh Napier University  

Experio: a Design for Novel Audience Participation in Club Settings 
Bastiaan van Hout, Luca Giacolini, Bart Hengeveld, Mathias Funk and Joep Frens
Eindhoven University of Technology  

Rhythm Apparatus on Overhead 
Christian Faubel 
Academy of Media Arts Cologne  

SPINE: A TUI Toolkit and Physical Computing Hybrid 
Aristotelis Hadjakos and Simon Waloschek
Center of Music and Film Informatics, HfM Detmold 

Striso, A Compact Expressive Instrument Based On A New Isomorphic Note Layout
Piers Titus van der Torren
Independent Researcher

The Composing Hand: Musical Creation with Leap Motion and the BigBang Rubette
Daniel Tormoen, Florian Thalmann and Guerino Mazzola
University of Minnesota

The Owl Programmable Stage Effects Pedal: Revising The Concept Of The On-Stage Computer For Live Music Performance
Thomas Webster, Guillaume LeNost and Martin Klang
Lionfish Audio, Rebel Technology

Visualizing Song Structure on Timecode Vinyls
Florian Heller and Jan Borchers
RWTH Aachen University  

 

Authors
CF

christian faubel

researcher, Academy of Media Arts Cologne|Cologne||Germany
What is it that enables autonomous behavior? I find it fascinating that complex autonomous behavior may result from the interaction of very simple units and from the dynamics of interaction between such units. I explore the assembly of simple units into systems and the emergence of autonomous behavior both in artistic and in scientific research. | | I studied mechanical engineering in Toulouse and Dresden from 1992 – 1999. After my studies... Read More →
FH

Florian Heller

RWTH Aachen University
FT

Florian Thalmann

Ph.D., University of Minnesota
AT

Augoustinos Tsiros

PhD Candidate/ Part-time Lecturer, Edinburgh Napier University
Augoustinos Tsiros is PhD candidate working in the area of audio-visual interaction for feature-based sound synthesis. Augoustinos is particularly interested in the study of the underlying principles that mediate cross-modal binding and non-linguistic congruency effects . He holds an MSc in Sound Design from the University of Edinburgh and a BEng in Multimedia Systems. His research interests range from multimodal Interaction, perception... Read More →
TW

Thomas Webster

Technical support / Lecturer in Music Making, University of Bedfordshire


Wednesday July 2, 2014 16:30 - 17:30
New Academic Building: Room 314

16:30

[SESSION 9] POSTERS
Separation: Short Range Repulsion. Implementation of an automated aesthetic synchronization system for a dance performance.
Michael Krzyzaniak, Julie Akerly, Matthew Mosher, Muharrem Yildirim
School of Arts, Media + Engineering, Arizona State University

Notation, mapping and composition for the Karlax
Tom Mays and Francis Faber
Académie Supérieur de Musique de Strasbourg, La Grande Fabrique

The Cave of Sounds: An interactive installation exploring how we create music together

Tim Murray-Browne, Dom Aversano, Susanna Garcia, Wallace Hobbes, Daniel Lopez, Tadeo Sendon, Panagiotis Tigas, Kacper Ziemianin, Duncan Chapman
Queen Mary University of London, Music Hackspace, Sound and Music

OSC-Namespace and OSC-State: schemata for describing the namespace and state of OSC-enabled systems

Ilias Bergstrom and Joan Llobera
Fondation Agalm, EventLAB, Universitat de Barcelona, Immersive Interaction Group, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Chronicles of a Robotic Musical Companion

Mason Bretan and Gil Weinberg
Georgia Institute of Technology

Structure-borne Sound and Aurally Active Spaces

Otso Lähdeoja
University of the Arts, Helsinki

TouchNoise: A Particle-based Multitouch Noise Modulation Interface

Axel Berndt, Nadia Al-Kassab, Raimund Dachselt
Technische Universität Dresden

Designing Sound Collaboratively - Perceptually Motivated Audio Synthesis

Niklas Klügel, Georg Groh, Timo Becker
Technische Universität München, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Repurposing Video Game Software for Musical Expression: A Perceptual Approach
Adriana Sa
Goldsmiths, University of London, Dep. Computing, EAVI

The Development Of Physical Spatial Controllers

Bridget Johnson, Michael Norris, Ajay Kapur
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand School of Music, California Institute of the Arts

Evaluating the Performance of a New Gestural Instrument Within an Ensemble

Alon Ilsar, Mark Havryliv, Andrew Johnston
University of Technology, Sydney, The Australian Institute of Music, University of Technology Sydney

Extending the Nexus Data Exchange Format (NDEF) Specification

Lawrence Fyfe, Adam Tindale, Sheelagh Carpendale
University of Calgary, OCAD University

Operating Sound Parameters Using Markov Model and Bayesian Filters in Automated Music Performance

Fumito Hashimoto and Motoki Miura
Kyushu Institute of Technology

The Talking Guitar: Headstock Tracking and Mapping Strategies

Liam Donovan and Andrew McPherson
Queen Mary, University of London

Algorave: A survey of the history, aesthetics and technology of live performance of algorithmic electronic dance music

Nick Collins and Alex McLean
University of Durham, University of Leeds

Design and Evaluation of a Gesture Controlled Singing Voice Installation
Cornelius Poepel, Jochen Feitsch, Marco Strobel, Christian Geiger
University of Applied Sciences Düsseldorf and University of Applied Sciences Ansbach

SynthAssist: Querying an Audio Synthesizer by Vocal Imitation
Mark Cartwright and Bryan Pardo
Northwestern University

TAPIR Sound Tag: An Enhanced Sonic Communication Framework for Audience Participatory Performance

Jimin Jeon, Gunho Chae, Edward Jangwon Lee, Woon Seung Yeo
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, KAIST

Lessons Learned in Exploring the Leap Motion(TM) Sensor for Gesture-based Instrument Design
Jihyun Han and Nicolas Gold
University College London

Twkyr: a Multitouch Waveform Looper
Karl Yerkes and Matthew Wright
Media Arts and Technology Program at University of California, Santa Barbara, UCSB

YouHero - Making an Expressive Concert Instrument from the GuitarHero Controller
Palle Dahlstedt, Patrik Karlsson, Katarina Widell, Tony Blomdahl
University of Gothenburg, freelance guitarist and lutenist, duo EN.D.E., freelance musician, duo EN.D.E., Geiger Music

Quick Live Coding Collaboration In The Web Browser
Chad McKinney
University of Sussex

endo/exo - Making Art and Music with Distributed Computing
Jiffer Harriman, Michael Theodore, Nikolaus Correll, Hunter Ewen
University of Colorado, University of Colorado at Boulder

A Material Computation Perspective on Audio Mosaicing and Gestural Conditioning
Navid Navab, Doug Van Nort, Sha Xin Wei
Topological Media Lab, Concordia University, Concordia University

The Siren Organ
Regina Collecchia, Dan Somen, Kevin McElroy
Stanford University

Internally Actuated Drums for Expressive Performance
David Rector and Spencer Topel
Dartmouth College

AlphaSphere - from Prototype to Product
Adam Place, Liam Lacey, Thomas Mitchell
nu desine, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK

WIJAM: A Mobile Collaborative Improvisation Platform under Master-players Paradigm
Junqi Deng, Francis Chi Moon Lau, Ho-Cheung Ng, Yu-Kwong Kwok, Hung-Kwan Chen, Yu-heng Liu
The University of Hong Kong

You’ll Never Walk Alone: Composing Location-Based Soundtracks
Adrian Hazzard, Steve Benford, Gary Burnett
University of Nottingham

Moderators
AA

Alessandro Altavilla

Postgraduate Student (MPhil/PhD), Goldsmiths, University of London
MD

Marco Donnarumma

Co-Founder, Xth
Italian-born Marco Donnarumma is a performer, musician and writer based in London. He explores the dimensions of the human body in relation to real, virtual and cultural spaces through performances, concerts and installations. In his works, sound, machines and biology are configured so to integrate human and technological bodies into new living instances. His practice is considered a conceptually elaborated combination of physical actions... Read More →

Authors
ZK

Ziemianin, Kacper

Royal Conservatory of the Hague|The Hague||The Netherlands
avatar for Julie Akerly

Julie Akerly

JAMovement
No Matter Where You Go, That's Where You Are | | Julie Akerly is the co-director of artist residency space, [nueBOX], founder of Phoenix Dance Observer, artistic director of J.A.M. (Julie Akerly Movement), and dancer with Jordan Daniels Dance. She received an MFA in Dance and Interdisciplinary Multimedia and Performance from Arizona State University. She is interested in expanding audience interaction and engagement through adapting the... Read More →
MC

Mark Cartwright

Research Assistant, Northwestern University
My research interests include the creation of new tools for audio and music production that support creativity in novices by allowing natural communication of audio concepts.
NC

Nick Collins

Nick Collins is Reader in Composition at Durham University. His research interests include live computer music, musical artificial intelligence, and computational musicology, and he is a frequent international performer as composer-programmer-pianist, from algoraves to electronic chamber music. His latest book, co-written with Scott Wilson and Margaret Schedel, is Electronic Music (Cambridge University Press Introductions series, 2013). ... Read More →
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  
FF

Francis Faber

la grande fabrique
Francis Faber composes, plays and teaches electronic music.  As a composer, he is focusing on real time electronic music and works with Percussions de Strasbourg, Ars Nova, TM+, Puce Muse, Musique Nouvelle, Art Zoyd, Ensemble Orchestral Contemporain…, and for live multimedia, installations, and young audience performances. He plays new digitals instruments ( Méta-Instrument, Wiimote, Karlax…) and leads La Grande Fabrique, a music and... Read More →
avatar for Adrian Hazzard

Adrian Hazzard

PhD Candidate, University of Nottingham
Adrian is a composer, musician, educator and a PhD candidate, working in the Mixed Reality Lab, University of Nottingham, UK. His work explores location based music, and in particular using the core components of music - such as melody, harmony, rhythm and timbre - to structure the exploration of spaces.
avatar for Alon Ilsar

Alon Ilsar

Artistic Director and Founder, Mutensils
Alon Ilsar is a Sydney based drummer, composer, sound designer and instrument designer. He is currently designing a new interface for electronic percussionists called the AirSticks, using the instrument in projects such as The Sticks, Silent Spring, Malarkey, Kirin J Callinan and Brian Campeau. He has also been heavily involved in theatre and film as drummer, composer and sound designer. His diverse projects include Alan Cumming, Keating! the... Read More →
AJ

Andrew Johnston

Andrew is a researcher, interaction/software designer and musician based at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). He has qualifications in music performance and computing and a PhD combining the two. As a musician he has performed professionally with several Australian symphony orchestras, musicals and a number of other ensembles. His practice and research focuses on the design of systems that support experimental, exploratory approaches... Read More →
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts
avatar for Liam Lacey

Liam Lacey

Software Developer, nu desine
Music. Computers. Innovation. | | I develop software for the AlphaSphere. | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVyYkMmgaJs | | I also write and produce music when I have time. | | http://liamtmlacey.tumblr.com | http://www.alphasphere.com | http://liamtmlacey.blogspot.com | http://www.soundcloud.com/liam-lacey | http://www.youtube.com/millenliam
OL

Otso Lahdeoja

University of the Arts, Sibelius Academy|Helsinki||Finland
avatar for Edward Jangwon Lee

Edward Jangwon Lee

PhD Candidate, KAIST
TM

Tom Mays

Composer, Teacher, Conservatoire de Strasbourg, Conservatoire de Paris
Tom Mays is a composer and computer musician. His works include electroacoustic pieces, instruments with electronics, music for dance, theater, interactive installation and film. He is currently working on the suite “The Well-tempered Patch” for basic real time processing and solo instruments, and is especially interested in gestural performance of real-time computer systems for the performing arts. He teaches Electroacoustic Composition... Read More →
AM

Alex McLean

I am a research fellow and deputy director of ICSRiM (the Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Research in Music) in Leeds. http://yaxu.org/
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →
TM

Tim Murray-Browne

Researcher & Artist, Queen Mary University of London
I'm a research assistant at the Centre for Digital Music creating Harmonic Motion, software designed to make it easier to analyse movement data and draw out musical features. | | I'm also an artist working with interactive sound. I recently completed an interactive sound installation called The Cave of Sounds with the Music Hackspace last year. | | My next project is an interactive audiovisual dance work in collaboration with the... Read More →
avatar for Navid Navab

Navid Navab

Véritable alchimiste des médias, le Montréalais Navid Navab est à la fois compositeur, artiste, programmeur et designer sonore.
BP

Bryan Pardo

Professor, Northwestern University
audio production tools | interfaces that learn | signal processing | playing the clarinet | jazz | maqam
AP

Adam Place

CEO, nu desine
Commercialising NIME's | AlphaSphere, BetaLoop, Gamma..?..,
SX

Sha Xin Wei

Director, School of Arts, Media and Engineering, ASU
philosophy of technology, sound art, sound studies, responsive environments, topological dynamical system; quality vs quantity, measurement and quantum mechanics; ecology of practices, atelier-lab. | | http://topologicalmedialab.net | http://synthesis.ame.asu.edu


Wednesday July 2, 2014 16:30 - 17:30
New Academic Building: Room 314

18:00

NIME Banquet Dinner
Our official NIME Banquet! Come and join us on Goldsmiths Green (under a marquee) for our Banquet BBQ. We will be catering for most food types and the BBQ will feature several outside-intervention performances.

Once we have dined, we will move into Goldsmiths Great Hall for the Keynote Performances and Speeches. Attendees who registered for the full conference will automatically receive a ticket for the Banquet. Attendees who registered for only 1-day of the conference must purchase a separate ticket for the Banquet.  
Tickets are available here: http://www.nime2014.org/registration/
£50 Full Price
£40 Student Price 

Wednesday July 2, 2014 18:00 - 19:45
The Green Goldsmiths Campus

19:30

Keynote Addresses & Performance
For the first time, we open our NIME 2014 keynote speeches and performances to the public. 

Hiroshi Ishii will deliver his keynote speech, and Laetitia Sonami will give her keynote performance of new music made on self-designed instruments, including the Ladies Glove.

For more information on the Keynote speakers, please visit: http://www.nime2014.org/keynotes/ 

Authors
HI

Hiroshi Ishii

Associate Director, MIT Media Lab
Where the sea meets the land, life has blossomed into a myriad of unique forms in the turbulence of water, sand, and wind. At another seashore between the land of atoms and the sea of bits, we are now facing the challenge of reconciling our dual citizenships in the physical and digital worlds. Windows to the digital world are confined to flat square screens and pixels, or "painted bits." Unfortunately, one can not feel and confirm the virtual... Read More →

Artists
LS

Laetitia Sonami

Lady's Glove Performance | |  


Wednesday July 2, 2014 19:30 - 21:00
Great Hall Goldsmiths

20:30

[Improv NIME]
***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

The back room of the Amersham Arms will play host to virtuosic instrumentalists, working with old and new technologies. John Butcher’s extended saxophone techniques show how old instruments can still be used in new ways they were never designed for, wtih glorious sonic results.

Violin Vacuum One
Alon Ilsar and Bronwyn Cumbo

Derivations
Benjamin Carey

Speak
Jonathan Impett


John Butcher

Colloidal Shiver
FHM (Lauren Hayes, Christos Michalakos and John Ferguson)

 

Wednesday July 2, 2014 20:30 - 23:59
Amersham Arms New Cross

21:00

Alon Ilsar - Violin Vacuum One
Violin Vacuum One

Violin Vacuum One is one in a series of pieces by Alon Ilsar that feature his new gestural instrument for electronic percussion called the AirSticks. For these pieces, Ilsar has limited his palette of sounds to only those sampled from the other featured instrument; in this case, the violin played by Bronwyn Cumbo. Some samples are pre-recorded in previous sessions, others are sampled live, and all are triggered and manipulated live by Ilsar on the AirSticks alongside the score for the violin. The AirSticks allows the electronic percussionist to map various percussive gestures in different spaces to different sounds. It also allows the manipulation of these samples through changes in position and orientation of the hands, fingers and feet.

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

Artists
avatar for Alon Ilsar

Alon Ilsar

Artistic Director and Founder, Mutensils
Alon Ilsar is a Sydney based drummer, composer, sound designer and instrument designer. He is currently designing a new interface for electronic percussionists called the AirSticks, using the instrument in projects such as The Sticks, Silent Spring, Malarkey, Kirin J Callinan and Brian Campeau. He has also been heavily involved in theatre and film as drummer, composer and sound designer. His diverse projects include Alan Cumming, Keating! the... Read More →



Wednesday July 2, 2014 21:00 - 21:20
Amersham Arms New Cross

21:20

Ben Carey - _derivations
_derivations | improvisation for saxophone and interactive performance system

_derivations is a semi-autonomous software system designed to take part in improvised encounters with instrumental musicians. _derivations listens to the performance of its collaborator and uses this information to make decisions about its own contribution to an unfolding improvised dialogue.

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

Artists
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →



Wednesday July 2, 2014 21:20 - 21:40
Amersham Arms New Cross

21:40

Jonathan Impett - Speak
Speak for metatrumpet and computers

In this fourth­‐generation development of the metatrumpet, the instrument is extended to incorporate the performing environment. It becomes part of an active sound space, transforming its own acoustic context.  

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

Artists
JI

Jonathan Impett

Jonathan Impett has given premieres of solo works by Berio, Scelsi, Finnissy and Harvey at venues such as IRCAM and the BBC Proms, and plays with contemporary group Apartment House, as well as improvised music and jazz with groups such as Paul Dunmall’s ensemble. He was awarded a Prix Ars Electronica for his work with the extended metatrumpet. Jonathan Impett is Reader in Music at Middlesex University.


Wednesday July 2, 2014 21:40 - 22:00
Amersham Arms New Cross

22:00

John Butcher
JOHN BUTCHER has been invited by BEAM Festival.

With a conference looking at ‘new’ interfaces for musical expression, we think it is important to look at how ‘old’ interfaces are still used in innovative ways, and how musicians can creatively (mis)use instruments in ways the makers never intended. John Butcher is one such musician who has developed advanced extended techniques on the saxophone. He has played with many of the great improvisers of our age, and is one of the most important musicians both in the local London and international improv scenes. 

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***

Artists
JB

John Butcher

JOHN BUTCHER has been invited by BEAM Festival. | | With a conference looking at ‘new’ interfaces for musical expression, we think it is important to look at how ‘old’ interfaces are still used in innovative ways, and how musicians can creatively (mis)use instruments in ways the makers never intended. John Butcher is one such musician who has developed advanced extended techniques on the saxophone. He has played with many... Read More →


Wednesday July 2, 2014 22:00 - 22:30
Amersham Arms New Cross

22:30

FHM - Colloidal Shiver
Colloidal Shiver

Excited by the sonic possibilities offered by digitally augmented instruments, the collaborative practice of Ferguson/Hayes/Michalakos explores common themes of physicality, gestural interaction, and responsiveness in live electronic music. This trio utilises laptop-processed electric guitar with external controllers; drum machines, haptic-controllers, analogue synthesizers and laptop; and a computer augmented drum kit. The goal is to navigate a sonic territory that darts from spattered beats, to tightly coupled rhythmic passages, through free noise improvisation, to gratuitous pop ‘hooks’, all the while striving to negotiate structures and establish communication within a collaborative improvisational environment.

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE*** 

Artists
avatar for Christos Michalakos

Christos Michalakos

Lecturer, Abertay University
Christos is a composer, performer, sound artist and software developer. His work explores the relationships between sound, space, games and bespoke performance environments. | | He has presented works and talked at a wide range of conferences and festivals including the London Jazz Festival (London 2015), Game Developers Conference (San Francisco 2015), ACM Creativity and Cognition (Glasgow 2015), New Interfaces for Musical Expression (Oslo... Read More →
JR

John Robert Ferguson

Visiting Assistant Professor, Brown University
John Robert Ferguson is a post-digital/electronic musician and visiting assistant professor at Multimedia and Electronic Music Experiments (MEME), Brown University.
avatar for Lauren Hayes

Lauren Hayes

Arizona State University
Lauren Sarah Hayes is a composer/performer/improviser from Glasgow,UK. Her work explores physicality and tactility within live electronicmusic through performance systems comprising ad-hoc combinations ofbespoke software, prepared piano, analogue monosynths, drum machinesand electronics. She enjoys performing her music around the world inunconventional spaces, engaging with a broad range of collaborators,as well as writing about the musical... Read More →



Wednesday July 2, 2014 22:30 - 22:50
Amersham Arms New Cross
 
Thursday, July 3
 

08:30

Conference REGISTRATION
Upon arrival, you should visit the registration desk in the New Academic Building cafe to register and collect your conference bag and programme.  

Registration will be open daily from 8.30am - 2pm.

Thursday July 3, 2014 08:30 - 14:00
New Academic Building Cafe Ground Floor

09:00

[INSTALLATIONS]
We are excited to present a range of installations from NIME artists and researchers:

Fordham Park

The Pedalling Games (Kaffe Matthews)

New Academic Building, Weston Atrium

Tipping Point (Kathy Hinde)

Acoustic Cluster (Mari Ohno)

DOT, a videogame with no winner (Henrique Roscoe)

s_platters (Freida Abtan)

Quotidian Record (Brian House)

FADE OUT (Paul Destieu)

I am not playing violin (Jasper Fung)

Humming Mississippi (Jesse Allison and Frederick Ostrenko)

Convergence (Jordan Hochenbaum, Owen Vallis and Jasmin Blasco)

New Academic Building, Top Floor

Sense Boxes (Heather Frasch)

The Octopus (Michael Lyons, Haruka Mitani, Palle Dahlstedt and Axel Mulder)

Dirty Tangible Interfaces (Matthieu Savary, Diemo Schwarz, Denis Pellerin, Florence Massin and Roland Cahen)

Colpersys4 (Steve Symons)

New Academic Building, Mezzanines + Atrium

Rwar (Courtney Brown and Sharif Razzaque)

Roboterstück (Arne Eigenfeldt)

Deptford Town Hall

Echo Moiré (Matteo Marangoni)

Electronic Music Studios, Richard Hoggart Building

MirrorFugue (Xiao Xiao and Hiroshi Ishii)
 

Artists
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
AM

Axel Mulder

President, Infusion Systems
May I-CubeX you ?
avatar for Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown

Courtney Brown is an interactive sound artist, Argentine tango dancer, and computer music researcher. She is a doctoral candidate in Digital Media and Performance at Arizona State University, and a graduate of Dartmouth’s Electroacoustic Master’s Program. A former Fulbright Fellow, she developed interactive Argentine tango dance during her residency in Buenos Aires, Argentina. This on-going project gives dancers agency over music, their... Read More →
avatar for Derick Ostrenko

Derick Ostrenko

Assistant Professor, LSU
Frederick Ostrenko, is a media artist and Assistant Professor at Louisiana State University. He holds a joint ­appointment in the Digital Art concentration at the School of Art and the Cultural Computing research group at the Center for Computation and Technology. Derick creates physical and virtual systems that examine the intersections of media, culture, and technology. Derick received his MFA in Digital+Media from the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
DS

Diemo Schwarz

Diemo Schwarz, born in Germany in 1969, is a researcher and developer at Ircam (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique-Musique, Paris), composer of electronic music, and musician on drums and laptop. | His research work includes improving interaction between musician and computer, and exploiting large masses of sound for interactive real-time sound synthesis, collaborating with composers such as Philippe Manoury, Dai... Read More →
FA

Freida Abtan

Freida Abtan is a Canadian multi-disciplinary artist and composer. Her music falls somewhere in between musique concrete and more modern noise and experimental audio and both genres are influential to her sound. Her work has been compared to bands such as Coil, and Zoviet France, because of her use of spectral manipulation and collage. | Freida primarily works with samples of both musical and non-musical objects that she records herself and then... Read More →
HF

Heather Frasch

HEATHER FRASCH is a sound artist whose work explores the intersection of acoustic & electroacoustic composition, improvisation, interactive performance, new media theory and sound installations. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley where she studied composition with Franck Bedrossian, and interactive electronic music at CNMAT with Edmund Campion & David Wessel. Her music has been performed at festivals and... Read More →
HR

Henrique Roscoe

Henrique Roscoe is a digital artist, musician and designer. Works in the audiovisual area since 2004. Has a conceptual and generative project called ‘HOL’. All the compositions seek a correspondence between audio and video and they are performed live or in the form of videos or installations.  Makes part of the audiovisual duo ‘ligalingha’. Develops interactive installations, programming in Processing, vvvv and... Read More →
HI

Hiroshi Ishii

Associate Director, MIT Media Lab
Where the sea meets the land, life has blossomed into a myriad of unique forms in the turbulence of water, sand, and wind. At another seashore between the land of atoms and the sea of bits, we are now facing the challenge of reconciling our dual citizenships in the physical and digital worlds. Windows to the digital world are confined to flat square screens and pixels, or "painted bits." Unfortunately, one can not feel and confirm the virtual... Read More →
HB

House, Brian

Brown University|Providence|RI|USA
Brian House is a media artist whose work traverses alternative geographies, experimental music, and a critical data practice. He is interested in the contingent qualities of information and how we experience time in network culture. By constructing embodied, participatory systems, he seeks to negotiate between algorithms and the rhythms of everyday life. | | Currently, Brian teaches in the Digital + Media program at the Rhode Island School of... Read More →
JB

Jasmin Blasco

Jasmin Blasco is a French/American artist living in Los Angeles CA. | Trained in Music Technology at the California Institute of the Arts, he is interested in the narrative and sculptural aspects of sound. | He is developing an investigative and exploratory practice over a variety of media in which research and collaboration play a fundamental role. | | In 2013 he launched The NOISE INDEX, a collaborative research platform to explore... Read More →
JF

Jasper Fung

Jasper Fung (b.1988) is a Hong Kong based media artist, performer and musician. His work intertwines installation, music and sonic composition that significantly arouse introspection into today’s discourteous and coarse world alongside the rapid elimination of social interactiveness. Fung’s work explores the terrain over classical, alternative, sound and space, rooted in his determination to challenge any models of traditional... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Allison

Jesse Allison

Experimental Music & Digital Media, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|United States
Jesse Allison is a professor at LSU in Experiment Music & Digital Media. As part of the AVATAR initiative, he is actively performing research and collaboration into ways that technology can expand what is possible in the arts. As an artist, Allison has disseminated works and research around the globe through live performance art, interactive installations, virtual and hybrid worlds installations, and paper presentations. Allison received his... Read More →
JH

Jordan Hochenbaum

Jordan Natan Hochenbaum is an artist concerned with finding meaningful connections between music, art, and technology. Currently, his work involves designing novel interfaces for expressive user interaction and musical performance, multimodal sensor systems, and playing and composing in a wide range of musical genres, from electronic music to North Indian classical. As a musician, Jordan actively releases music under the Natan H moniker. As... Read More →
KM

Kaffe Matthews

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project... Read More →
MM

Matteo Marangoni

Matteo Marangoni is a DIY enthusiast that operates at the margins of various artistic disciplines. His practice investigates the perception of space and the subject-object dichotomy through processes that articulate the real within idiosyncratic rituals. He is a founding member of the artist collective iii, curates the nomadic performance series “No Patent Pending” and writes about self-made performative media on Neural... Read More →
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →
OV

Owen Vallis

Owen Vallis is a musician and artist interested in performance, sound, and technology. As a co-founder of Flipmu, Owen explores a diverse range of projects including producing other musicians, composing his own music, building audio processors, and designing new hardware interfaces for musical performance. Having lived in Toronto, Canada, Wellington, New Zealand, San Francisco, Nashville, and Los Angeles, Owen has been able to develop a broad and... Read More →
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  
PD

Paul Destieu

Paul Destieu lives and works in Marseille, France. | His researches question tech­nology and its impact on our envi­ronment. His work exa­mines the situation of machines within our society noti­ceably fed by the history of media. He uses cali­bration, syn­chro­ni­zation pro­cesses or setup confi­gu­ra­tions as many means for art pro­duction. His art pro­duction focuses on the virtual and... Read More →
SS

Steve Symons

Steve is a sound artist known for an innovative series of sonic augmented reality projects titled 'aura', more recently his 'Gigzine' project exploring mass-interaction at music events and as a member of the award winning Owl Project. He creates digital systems for his own use, which are often released as free and open-source tools via his muio.org ltd consultancy. | | Owl Project is a three person collaboration (Steve Symons, Simon... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 09:00 - 18:00
Various Locations Golsmiths

09:30

[SESSION 10] AUDIO APPLICATIONS AND INSTALLATIONS
Session on Audio Applications and Installations

Session chair: Norbert Schnell 

Moderators
Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 10:54
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

A Morphological Analysis of Audio-Objects and their Control Methods for 3D Audio
A Morphological Analysis of Audio-Objects and their Control Methods for 3D Audio
Justin Mathew, Stephane Huot, Alan Blum
Université Paris-Sud & CNRS (LRI), DMS-Cinema, Université Paris-Sud & CNRS (LRI), Inria, ENS Louis Lumière

Long Paper

Recent technological improvements in audio reproduction systems increased the possibilities to spatialize sources in a listening environment. The spatialization of reproduced audio is however highly dependent on the recording technique, the rendering method, and the loudspeaker configuration. While object-based audio production has proven to reduce the dependency on loudspeaker configurations, authoring tools are still considered to be difficult to interact with in current production environments. In this paper, we investigate the issues of spatialization techniques for object-based audio production and introduce the Spatial Audio Design Spaces (SpADS) framework, that provides insights into the spatial manipulation of object-based audio. Based on interviews with professional sound engineers, this morphological analysis clarifies the relationships between recording and rendering techniques that define audio-objects for 3D speaker configurations, allowing the analysis and the design of advanced object-based controllers as well.


Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 10:55
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

Evaluating the Perceived Similarity Between Audio-Visual Features Using Corpus-Based Concatenative Synthesis
Evaluating the Perceived Similarity Between Audio-Visual Features Using Corpus-Based Concatenative Synthesis
Augoustinos Tsiros
Edinburgh Napier University

Long Paper

This paper presents the findings of two exploratory studies. In these studies participants performed a series of image-sound association tasks. The aim of the studies was to investigate the perceived similarity and the efficacy of two multidimensional mappings each consisting of three audio-visual associations. The purpose of the mappings is to enable visual control of corpus-based concatenative synthesis. More specifically the stimuli in the first study was designed to test the perceived similarity of six audio-visual associations, between the two mappings using three corpora resulting in 18 audio-visual stimuli. The corpora differ in terms of two sound characteristics: harmonic contain and continuity. Data analysis revealed no significant differences in the participant's responses between the three corpora, or between the two mappings. However highly significant differences were revealed between the individual audio-visual association pairs. The second study investigates the affects of the mapping and the corpus in the ability of the participants to detect which image out of three similar images was used to generate six audio stimuli. The data analysis revealed significant differences in the ability of the participants' to detect the correct image depending on which corpus was used. Less significant was the effect of the mapping in the success rate of the participant responses.

Authors
AT

Augoustinos Tsiros

PhD Candidate/ Part-time Lecturer, Edinburgh Napier University
Augoustinos Tsiros is PhD candidate working in the area of audio-visual interaction for feature-based sound synthesis. Augoustinos is particularly interested in the study of the underlying principles that mediate cross-modal binding and non-linguistic congruency effects . He holds an MSc in Sound Design from the University of Edinburgh and a BEng in Multimedia Systems. His research interests range from multimodal Interaction, perception... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 10:56
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

CollideFx: A Physics-Based Audio Effects Processor
CollideFx: A Physics-Based Audio Effects Processor
Chet Gnegy
CCRMA, Stanford University

Short Paper

CollideFx is a real-time audio effects processor that integrates the physics of real objects into the parameter space of the signal chain. Much like a traditional signal chain, the user can choose a series of effects and offer realtime control to their various parameters. In this work, we introduce a means of creating tree-like signal graphs that dynamically change their routing in response to changes in the location of the unit generators in a virtual space. Signals are rerouted using a crossfading scheme that avoids the harsh clicks and pops associated with amplitude discontinuities. The unit generators are easily controllable using a click and drag interface that responds using familiar physics. CollideFx brings the interactivity of a video game together with the purpose of creating interesting and complex audio effects. With little difficulty, users can craft custom effects, or alternatively, can fling a unit generator into a cluster of several others to obtain more surprising results, letting the physics engine do the decision making.

Authors

Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 10:57
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

VOCAL VIBRATIONS: A Multisensory Experience of the Voice
VOCAL VIBRATIONS: A Multisensory Experience of the Voice
Charles Holbrow, Elena Jessop, Rebecca Kleinberger
MIT Media Laboratory

Short Paper


Vocal Vibrations is a new project by the Opera of the Future group at the MIT Media Lab that seeks to engage the public in thoughtful singing and vocalizing, while exploring the relationship between human physiology and the resonant vibrations of the voice. This paper describes the motivations, the technical implementation, and the experience design of the Vocal Vibrations public installation. This installation consists of a space for reflective listening to a vocal composition (the Chapel) and an interactive space for personal vocal exploration (the Cocoon). In the interactive experience, the participant also experiences a tangible exteriorization of his voice by holding the ORB, a handheld device that translates his voice and singing into tactile vibrations. This installation encourages visitors to explore the physicality and expressivity of their voices in a rich musical context.


Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 10:58
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

Timbre morphing: near real-time hybrid synthesis in a musical installation
Timbre morphing: near real-time hybrid synthesis in a musical installation
Duncan Williams and Eduardo Miranda
ICCMR

Short Paper

This paper presents an implementation of a near real-time timbre morphing signal processing system, designed to facilitate an element of ‘liveness’ and unpredictability in a musical installation. The timbre morpher is a hybrid analysis and synthesis technique based on Spectral Modeling Synthesis (an additive and subtractive modeling technique). The musical installation forms an interactive soundtrack in response to the series of Rosso Luana marble sculptures Shapes in the Clouds, I, II, III, IV & V by artist Peter Randall-Page, exhibited at the Peninsula Arts Gallery in Devon, UK, from 1 February to 29 March 2014.


Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 10:59
New Academic Building: LG02

09:30

Acoustic Localisation as an Alternative to Positioning Principles in Applications presented at NIME 2001-2013
Acoustic Localisation as an Alternative to Positioning Principles in Applications presented at NIME 2001-2013
Dominik Schlienger and Sakari Tervo
Sibelius Academy, Aalto University

Short Paper


This paper provides a rationale for choosing acoustic localisation techniques as an alternative to other principles to provide spatial positions in interactive locative audio applications (ILAA). By comparing positioning technology in existing ILAAs to the expected performance of acoustic positioning systems (APS), we can evaluate if APS would perform equivalently in a particular application. In this paper, the titles of NIME conference proceedings from 2001 to 2013 were searched for presentations on ILAA using positioning technology. Over 80 relevant articles were found. For each of the systems we evaluated if and why APS would be a contender or not. The results showed that for over 73 percent of the reviewed applications, APS could possibly provide competitive alternatives and at very low cost.

Authors
avatar for Dominik Schlienger

Dominik Schlienger

Doctoral Student, Centre for Music & Technology, University of the Arts Helsini, Sibelius Academy
Dom Schlienger is a musician and composer-researcher. He's graduated with a MSc Audio Production from UWE Bristol in 2012 where he also did his BSc in Creative Music Technology in 2010. Now a doctoral student at Sibelius Academy Helsinki, Finland, he works on the development of an indoors positioning system for interactive audio applications on ubiquitous devices. He holds a graduate residency at Pervasive Media Studio Bristol, UK and also... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 09:30 - 11:00
New Academic Building: LG02

11:00

Dennis Van Tilburg - Musique Parabolique
Musique Parabolique

Armed with parabolic microphone and live sampling system Dennis van Tilburg takes his audience with wireless headphones on an auditory journey. During a walk through the neighbourhood he catches snatches of street scenes and mixes it live to a composition that manipulates reality. The show evokes associations with spy movies and defies the boundaries of privacy in public spaces when unsolicited outsiders become part of the performance. At unexpected moments it makes our experience eerie, surreal or absurdist.



Artists
DV

Dennis van Tilburg

www.dennisvantilburg.nl
 Musician and sound artist Dennis van Tilburg (1975) operates on the border where music disintegrates into chunks and where apparent loose sounds unexpectedly form wonderful music. He is always looking for new techniques to create an idiosyncratic sound palette. For Musique Parabolique Dennis finds inspiration in the ‘musique concrète’ from the forties and fifties of the last century.



Thursday July 3, 2014 11:00 - 11:30
310NXRd 310 New Cross Road

11:00

Break
Thursday July 3, 2014 11:00 - 11:30
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

[SESSION 11] INTERFACES: DEVELOPMENT, DEPLOYMENT, EVALUATION
Session on Interfaces: Development, Deployment, Evaluation

Session chair: Koray Tahiroğlu 

Moderators
avatar for Koray Tahiroğlu

Koray Tahiroğlu

Research Fellow, Aalto University|Espoo||Finland
http://sopi.aalto.fi/

Thursday July 3, 2014 11:30 - 12:55
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Forming Shapes to Bodies: Design for Manufacturing in the Prosthetic Instruments
Forming Shapes to Bodies: Design for Manufacturing in the Prosthetic Instruments
Ian Hattwick, Joseph Malloch, Marcelo Wanderley
McGill University

Long Paper

Moving new DMIs from the research lab to professional artistic contexts places new demands on both their design and manufacturing. Through a discussion of the Prosthetic Instruments, a family of digital musical instruments we de- signed for use in an interactive dance performance, we dis- cuss four different approaches to manufacturing – artisanal, building block, rapid prototyping, and industrial. We dis- cuss our use of these different approaches as we strove to reconcile the many conflicting constraints placed upon the instruments’ design due to their use as hypothetical prosthetic extensions to dancers’ bodies, as aesthetic objects, and as instruments used in a professional touring context. Experiences and lessons learned during the design and manufacturing process are discussed in relation both to these manufacturing approaches as well as to Bill Buxton’s concept of artist-spec design.

Authors
IH

Ian Hattwick

Ian Hattwick (Instrument Design) is a composer, performer, and digital musical instrument designer. His current research focuses on collaborative approaches to music performance using gestural interfaces. In 2013 he co-created the Prosthetic Instruments, family of gestural controllers in- tended to be worn by dancers, for which he composed and presented two compositions at the Cacoyannis Institute in Athens, Greece. He holds an MFA from the... Read More →
JM

Joseph Malloch

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Université Paris-Sud XI
Joseph Malloch holds a PhD from McGill University, Canada, on the design of new electronic interfaces for live music performance. His new instruments – including the T-Stick and the prosthetic "Spine" – have been performed and demonstrated across Europe, North and South America in dozens of concerts, including at international conferences, new music festivals, and performances with dancers.


Thursday July 3, 2014 11:30 - 12:56
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Constraining Movement as a Basis for DMI Design and Performance.
Constraining Movement as a Basis for DMI Design and Performance.
Giuseppe Torre and Nicholas Ward
University of Limerick

Long Paper

In this paper we describe the application of a movement-based design process for digital musical instruments which led to the development of a prototype DMI named the Twister. The development is described in two parts. Firstly, we consider the design of the interface or physical controller. Following this we describe the development of a specific sonic character, mapping approach and performance. In both these parts an explicit consideration of the type of movement we would like the device to engender in performance drove the design choices. By considering these two parts separately we draw attention to two different levels at which movement might be considered in the design of DMIs; at a general level of ranges of movement in the creation of the controller and a more specific, but still quite open, level in the creation of the final instrument and a particular performance. In light of the results of this process the limitations of existing representations of movement within the DMI design discourse is discussed. Further, the utility of a movement focused design approach is discussed.

Authors
avatar for Nicholas Ward

Nicholas Ward

lecturer/researcher, university of limerick
Im interested in play but specifically movement based interaction.


Thursday July 3, 2014 11:30 - 12:57
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Dimensionality and Appropriation in Digital Musical Instrument Design
Dimensionality and Appropriation in Digital Musical Instrument Design
Victor Zappi and Andrew McPherson
Queen Mary University of London

Long Paper

This paper investigates the process of appropriation in digital musical instrument performance, examining the effect of instrument complexity on the emergence of personal playing styles. Ten musicians of varying background were given a deliberately constrained musical instrument, a wooden cube containing a touch/force sensor, speaker and embedded computer. Each cube was identical in construction, but half the instruments were configured for two degrees of freedom while the other half allowed only a single degree. Each musician practiced at home and presented two performances, in which their techniques and reactions were assessed through video, sensor data logs, questionnaires and interviews. Results show that the addition of a second degree of freedom had the counterintuitive effect of reducing the exploration of the instrument's affordances; this suggested the presence of a dominant constraint in one of the two configurations which strongly differentiated the process of appropriation across the two groups of participants.

Authors
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →
avatar for Victor Zappi

Victor Zappi

Postdoctoral Fellow, Universtiy of British Columbia
_Electronic engineer in love with Music and New Media Art | _DMI design and test, vocal synthesis, embedded technologies, Virtual and Augmented Reality, dance and movement | _We don't necessarily have to talk about work ( ;


Thursday July 3, 2014 11:30 - 12:58
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

The Prospects For Eye-Controlled Musical Performance
The Prospects For Eye-Controlled Musical Performance
Anthony Hornof
University of Oregon

Long Paper

As new sensor devices and data streams are harnessed for musical expression, and as eye-tracking devices become increasingly cost-effective and prevalent in research and as a means of communication for people with severe motor impairments, eye-controlled musical expression nonetheless remains largely unexplored and elusive. This paper (a) identifies a number of fundamental human ocularmotor capabilities that may constrain what can be musically expressed with eye movements, (b) reviews prior work on eye-controlled musical expression, (c) discusses how careful consideration of these human constraints in the design of eye-controlled interfaces can nonetheless contribute to usable and expressive eye-controlled instruments that can, in turn, be used to create compelling audience experiences, and (d) presents a taxonomy to classify and categorize prior and future work on eye-controlled musical performance. The main dimension in the taxonomy relates to whether the goal of a particular eye-controlled instrument or composition is to create (a) an avant garde musical experience for a critical audience or (b) a simpler though perhaps more profound opportunity for a person with disabilities to express themselves musically. We argue that the only reasonable way to achieve the second of these two goals is to collaborate directly with the people with disabilities for whom the instrument is intended in the design of the instrument or composition. We conclude that overall the prospects for eye-controlled musical performance are somewhat constrained.

Authors

Thursday July 3, 2014 11:30 - 12:59
New Academic Building: LG02

11:30

Musical Interface Design: An Experience-oriented Framework
Musical Interface Design: An Experience-oriented Framework
Fabio Morreale, Antonella De Angeli, Sile O'Modhrain
University of Trento, University of Michigan

Long Paper

This paper presents MINUET, a framework for musical interface design grounded in the experience of the player. MINUET aims to provide new perspectives on the design of musical interfaces, referred to as a general term that comprises digital musical instruments and interactive installations. The ultimate purpose is to reduce the complexity of the design space emphasizing the experience of the player. MINUET is structured as a design process consisting of two stages: goal and specifications. The reliability of MINUET is tested through a systematic comparison with the related work and through a case study. To this end, we present the design and prototyping of Hexagon, a new musical interface with learning purposes.

Authors
FM

Fabio Morreale

PhD candidate, University of Trento
-


Thursday July 3, 2014 11:30 - 13:00
New Academic Building: LG02

13:00

Lunch
All registrants receive a catered lunch. There will be several stations set up across the New Academic Building so that your don't have to queue too much. 

Thursday July 3, 2014 13:00 - 14:00
New Academic Building Cafe Ground Floor

13:00

[BEAM@NIME: Kaffe Matthews - The Pedalling Games]
The Pedalling Games is a suite of interactive sonic bike pieces made for Fordham Park to be played by passing audience. Created using a brand new system developed by the BRI and explored with workshop participants at the NIME conference, park visitors can come cycle a bike in and around the park, making music dependant on how and where they go and how near or far they move from other sonic cyclists.

Solo or grouped, the 13 sonic bikes behave differently, some as synths, some as locative sample players, but all as instruments, sonically sensitive to the presence and absence of each other as the shape and size of the group and the decisions and actions of the performing cyclists constantly shifts. Moment by moment new music will be made by the audience through cycling.

The Bicrophonic Research Institute (BRI) is an association that researches and collaborates to make and share music from bicycles by pedalling through landscapes alone or together. Through ten years of international projects, the BRI has developed the sonic bike which plays music that changes dependant on where and how fast the cyclist goes through a pair of bike-mounted speakers and bespoke software to GPS system, the cyclist becoming the performer and the passers by audience. Established by Kaffe Matthews and Dave Griffiths in 2014, the BRI's collaborators for this piece include George Haworth and Lyubo Popomov.                                                                                    

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project music for bodies. Her 2004 collaboration Weightless Animals was awarded a BAFTA, she received a NESTA Dreamtime Fellowship in 2005 and an Award of Distinction, Prix Ars Electronica 2006 for the work Sonic Bed_London. In February 2006 she was made an Honorary Professor of Music, Shanghai Music Conservatory, China and in 2009, a patron of the Galapagos shark conservation society.

Artists
KM

Kaffe Matthews

Kaffe Matthews is an awarded sound artist composer who has been making new electro-acoustic music worldwide with things such as violin, theremin, sonic beds, NASA, sharks, children and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra since 1990. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works, and continues to direct vibratory interface design project... Read More →



Thursday July 3, 2014 13:00 - 18:00
Fordham Park

14:00

[SESSION 12] ROBOTIC AND MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS
Session on Robotic and Mechatronic Systems

Session chair: Ajay Kapur 

Moderators
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts

Thursday July 3, 2014 14:00 - 15:09
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Rasper: a Mechatronic Noise-Intoner
Rasper: a Mechatronic Noise-Intoner
Mo Zareei, Ajay Kapur, Dale A. Carnegie
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand School of Music, , Victoria University of Wellington, School of Engineering and Computer Science

Long Paper

Over the past few decades, there has been an increasing number of musical instruments and works of sound art that incorporate robotics and mechatronics. This paper proposes a new approach in classification of such works and focuses on those whose ideological roots can be sought in Luigi Russolo’s noise-intoners (intonarumori). It presents a discussion on works in which mechatronics is used to investigate new––and traditionally perceived as “extra-musical”––sonic territories, and introduces Rasper: a new mechatronic noise-intoner that features an electromechanical apparatus to create noise physically, while regulating it rhythmically and timbrally.

Authors
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts
avatar for Mo H. Zareei

Mo H. Zareei

PhD Candidate, Victoria University of Wellington
Mo H. Zareei is a sound artist and music technology researcher. Using custom-built software and hardware, his experiments with sound covers a wide range from electronic compositions to mechatronic sound-sculptures and installations. Striving to turn the harsh, unwanted, and unnoticeable into the pleasing and accessible, Zareei’s work is particularly targeted at the point where noise meets grid-based structures. He is currently pursuing his... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 14:00 - 15:11
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

The Robotic Taishogoto: A New Plug 'n Play Desktop Performance Instrument
The Robotic Taishogoto: A New Plug 'n Play Desktop Performance Instrument
Jason Long
Tokyo University of the Arts

Short Paper

This paper describes the Robotic Taishogoto, a new robotic musical instrument for performance, musical installations, and educational purposes. The primary goals of its creation is to provide an easy to use, cost effective, compact and integrated acoustic instrument which is fully automated and controllable via standard MIDI commands. This paper describes the technical details of its design and implementation including the mechanics, electronics and firmware. It also outlines various control methodologies and use cases for the instrument.

Authors

Thursday July 3, 2014 14:00 - 15:12
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Imitation Framework for Percussion
Imitation Framework for Percussion
Ozgur Izmirli and Jake Faris
Connecticut College

Short Paper

We present a framework for imitation of percussion performances with parameter-based learning for accurate reproduction. We constructed a robotic setup involving pull-solenoids attached to drum sticks which communicate with a computer through an Arduino microcontroller. The imitation framework allows for parameter adaptation to different mechanical constructions by learning the capabilities of the overall system being used. For the rhythmic vocabulary, we have considered regular stroke, flam and drag styles. A learning and calibration system was developed to efficiently perform grace notes for the drag rudiment as well as the single stroke and the flam rudiment. A second pre-performance process is introduced to minimize the latency difference between individual drum sticks in our mechanical setup. We also developed an off-line onset detection method to reliably recognize onsets from the microphone input. Once these pre-performance steps are taken, our setup will then listen to a human drummer’s performance pattern, analyze for onsets, loudness, and rudiment pattern, and then play back using the learned parameters for the particular system. We conducted three different evaluations of our constructed system.


Thursday July 3, 2014 14:00 - 15:13
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Distributed Control in a Mechatronic Musical Instrument
Distributed Control in a Mechatronic Musical Instrument
Michael Gurevich
University of Michigan

Short Paper

Drawing on concepts from systemics, cybernetics, and musical automata, this paper proposes a mechatronic, electroacoustic instrument that allows for shared control between programmed, mechanized motion and a human interactor. We suggest that such an instrument, situated somewhere between a robotic musical instrument and a passive controller, will foster the emergence of new, complex, and meaningful modes of musical interaction. In line with the methodological principles of practice as research, we describe the development and design of one such instrument—Stringtrees. The design process also reflects the notion of ambiguity as a resource in design: The instrument was endowed with a collection of sensors, controls, and actuators without a highly specific or prescriptive model for how a musician would interact with it.


Thursday July 3, 2014 14:00 - 15:14
New Academic Building: LG02

14:00

Rhythm Apparatus on Overhead
Rhythm Apparatus on Overhead
Christian Faubel
Academy of Media Arts Cologne

Short Paper

In the paper I present a robotic device that offers new ways of interaction for producing rhythmic patterns. The apparatus is placed on an overhead projector and a visual presentation of these rhythmic patterns is delivered as a shadow play. The rhythmic patterns can be manipulated by modifying the environment of the robot, through direct physical interaction with the robot, by rewiring the internal connectivity, and by adjusting internal parameters. The theory of embodied cognition provides the theoretical basis of this device. The core postulate of embodied cognition is that biological behavior can only be understood through an understanding of the real-time interactions of an organism's nervous system, the organism's body and the environment. One the one hand the device illustrates this theory because the patterns that are created equally depend on the real-time interactions of the electronics, the physical structure of the device and the environment. On the other hand the device presents a synthesis of these ideas and it is effectively possible to play with it at all the three levels, the electronics, the physical configuration of the robot and the environment.

Authors
CF

christian faubel

researcher, Academy of Media Arts Cologne|Cologne||Germany
What is it that enables autonomous behavior? I find it fascinating that complex autonomous behavior may result from the interaction of very simple units and from the dynamics of interaction between such units. I explore the assembly of simple units into systems and the emergence of autonomous behavior both in artistic and in scientific research. | | I studied mechanical engineering in Toulouse and Dresden from 1992 – 1999. After my studies... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
New Academic Building: LG02

15:00

[SESSION 13] DEMOS
3DinMotion - A mocap based interface for real time visualisation and sonification of multi-user interactions
Alain Renaud, Caecilia Charbonnier, Sylvain Chagué
Bournemouth University, Artnanim, Artanim

A Simple Architecture for Server-based (Indoor) Audio Walks
Thomas Resch and Matthias Krebs
University of Music Basel

Manhattan: End-User Programming for Music
Chris Nash
University of the West of England

Musical Instrument Mapping Design with Echo State Networks
Chris Kiefer
Goldsmiths College, University of London

Optical Measurement of Acoustic Drum Strike Locations
Janis Sokolovskis and Andrew McPherson
Queen Mary, University of London


Simplified Expressive Mobile Development with NexusUI, NexusUp, and NexusDrop
Benjamin Taylor, Jesse Allison, Daniel Holmes, William Conlin and Yemin Oh 
Louisiana State University

Soundbeam
Charles Hutchins
University of Kent

Tangible Scores: Shaping the Inherent Instrument Score
Enrique Tomás and Martin Kaltenbrunner
Interface Culture Lab - Kunstuniversität Linz

Techniques in Swept Frequency Capacitive Sensing: An Open Source Approach
Colin Honigman, Jordan Hochenbaum and Ajay Kapur
California Institute of the Arts

Wubbles: a collaborative ephemeral musical instrument
Florent Berthaut and Jarrod Knibbe
University of Bristol


Authors
MK

Martin Kaltenbrunner

Professor, Kunstuniversität Linz
Martin Kaltenbrunner is Professor at the Interface Culture Lab at the | University of Art and Design in Linz. Before his return to Austria he | worked as researcher at the Music Technology Group and lecturer at the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona. As co-founder of Reactable Systems he had been mainly working on the interaction design concepts behind the Reactable - a tangible modular synthesizer that has since been staged by several... Read More →
CK

Chris Kiefer

Researcher, Goldsmiths
AM

Andrew McPherson

Lecturer in Digital Media, Queen Mary University of London
Andrew McPherson is an electronic engineer, composer and instrument designer. His research focuses on augmented acoustic instruments and new performance interfaces which build on traditional instrumental training. Recent projects include the magnetic resonator piano (electromagnetically-augmented acoustic piano) which has been used in over a dozen pieces including projects with the London Chamber Orchestra and the band These New Puritans; and the... Read More →
CN

Chris Nash

Senior Lecturer in Music Technology, University of the West of England|Bristol||United Kingdom
Chris Nash is a professional programmer and composer, and currently Senior Lecturer in Music Technology (Soft ware Development for Audio, Sound, and Music) at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol, UK). He completed his PhD on music HCI at the University of Cambridge, looking at theoretical and analytical methods for modeling and designing interfaces for composition, supported by a longitudinal study of over 1,000 DAW users... Read More →
avatar for Janis Sokolovskis

Janis Sokolovskis

PhD Research Student, Queen Mary, University of London
PhD Research Student at Centre for Digital Music at Queen Mary, University of London. | | Research interests - Augmented Instruments, Audio Analysis, Music Learning Technologies.
ET

Enrique Tomas

Lecturer & PhD Candidate, Kunstuniversität Linz
Enrique Tomás (Madrid, 1981) is a sound artist and researcher who dedicates his time to finding new ways of expression and play with sound, art and technology. His work explores the intersection between sound art, computer music, locative media and human-machine interaction. As an individual artist, Tomás’ activity is centered around "ultranoise.es" and focuses on performances and installations with extreme... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 15:00 - 16:00
New Academic Building: Room 314

15:00

[SESSION 13] POSTERS
CHIMAERA - the poly-magneto-phonic theremin - an expressive touch-less hall-effect sensor array
Hanspeter Portner
Open Music Kontrollers

Collaborative Live-Coding with an Immersive Instrument
Graham Wakefield, Charlie Roberts, Matthew Wright, Timothy Wood, Karl Yerkes
KAIST, UC Santa Barbara, UCSB, University of California Santa Barbara, Media Arts and Technology Program at University of California, Santa Barbara

Composing for DMIs - Entoa, a dedicate piece for Intonaspacio
Clayton Mamedes, Mailis Rodrigues, Marcelo M. Wanderley, Jônatas Manzolli, Denise H. L. Garcia, Paulo Ferreira-Lopes
NICS-CIDDIC Unicamp, CIRMMT-IDMIL, CITAR UCP, CIRMMT-IDMIL, CIRMMT-IDMIL, NICS Unicamp, CIDDIC Unicamp, CITAR UCP

Conducting collective instruments : A case study
Josep Comajuncosas and Enric Guaus
Escola Superior de Musica de Catalunya

Conductive Music: Teaching Innovative Interface Design and Composition Techniques with Open-Source Hardware
Enrico Bertelli and Emily Robertson
Queen's University Belfast

Controlling Physically Based Virtual Musical Instruments Using The Gloves
Stefania Serafin, Stefano Stereo, Tom Mitchell, Francesco Grani, Seb Madgwick, Hannah Perner-Wilson
Aalborg University Copenhagen, Bristol University, X-IO, Plusea

Designing Mappings for the Sponge: Towards Spongistic Music
Martin Marier
Université de Montréal

Designing Sound for Recreation and Well-Being
Anders-Petter Andersson, Birgitta Cappelen, Fredrik Olofsson
The Oslo School of Architecture and Design

Distributing Mobile Music Applications for Audience Participation Using Mobile Ad-hoc Network (MANET)
Sang Won Lee, Georg Essl, Z. Morley Mao
University of Michigan

El-Lamellophone - A Low-cost, DIY, Open Framework for Acoustic Lemellophone Based Hyperinstruments
Shawn Trail
University of Victoria

Gesture and Embodied Metaphor in Spatial Music Performance Systems Design.
Ricky Graham and Brian Bridges
Stevens Institute of Technology, University of Ulster

Improvasher: a real-time mashup system for live musical input
Matthew Davies, Adam Stark, Masataka Goto, Fabien Gouyon
INESC TEC, Independent, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)

In A State: Live Emotion Detection and Visualisation for Music Performance
Adinda van 't Klooster and Nick Collins
University of Durham

Musical composition by regressional mapping of physiological responses to acoustic features
Valtteri Wikström
Aalto University and Helsinki University

Notation, mapping and composition for the Karlax
Tom Mays and francis faber
Académie Supérieur de Musique de Strasbourg, La Grande Fabrique

Polus: The Design and Development of a New, Mechanically Bowed String Instrument Ensemble
Blake Johnston, Henry Dengate Thrush, Tane Moleta, Jim Murphy, Ajay Kapur
Victoria University of Wellington,

Reunion2012: A novel interface for sound producing actions through the game of chess
Magnus Bugge, Hans Wilmers, Anders Tveit, Notto Thelle, Thom Johansen, Eskil Muan Sæther
Norwegian Centre for Technology in Music and the Arts

Robot: Tune Yourself! Automatic Tuning for Musical Robotics
Jim Murphy, Paul Mathews, Dale Carnegie, Ajay Kapur
Victoria University of Wellington, California Institute of the Arts

Sketch-Based Musical Composition and Performance
Haojing Diao, Yanchao Zhou, Christopher Andrew Harte, Nick Bryan-Kinns
Queen Mary University of London, Queen Mary University of London - Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications

Smartphone-based Music conducting
Yang Kyu Lim and Woon Seung Yeo
KAIST

SOUND TOSSING Audio Devices in the Context of Street Art
Reinhard Gupfinger, Martin Kaltenbrunner
Kunstuniversität Linz, Interface Culture, Austria


The Birl: An Electronic Wind Instrument Based on an Artificial Neural Network Parameter Mapping Structure
Jeff Snyder and Danny Ryan
Princeton University


The Manipuller II: Strings within a Force Sensing Ring
Adrian Barenca and Milos Corak
Music Technologist, Software Developer

The Space Between Us. A live performance with musical score generated via emotional levels measured in EEG of one performer and an audience member
Joel Eaton, Weiwei Jin, Eduardo Miranda
University of Plymouth, De Montfort University

Unsounding Objects: Audio Feature for Control of Sound Synthesis in a Digital Percussion Instrument
Ian Hattwick, Preston Beebe, Zachary Hale, Marcelo Wanderley, Philippe Leroux, Fabrice Marandola
McGill University

Use of Body Motion to Enhance Traditional Musical Instruments
Federico Visi, Rodrigo Schramm, Eduardo Miranda
Plymouth University, UFRGS

Visualizing Gestures in the Control of a Digital Musical Instrument
Olivier Perrotin and Christophe d'Alessandro

LIMSI-CNRS, Université Paris-Sud






Moderators
AA

Alessandro Altavilla

Postgraduate Student (MPhil/PhD), Goldsmiths, University of London
MD

Marco Donnarumma

Co-Founder, Xth
Italian-born Marco Donnarumma is a performer, musician and writer based in London. He explores the dimensions of the human body in relation to real, virtual and cultural spaces through performances, concerts and installations. In his works, sound, machines and biology are configured so to integrate human and technological bodies into new living instances. His practice is considered a conceptually elaborated combination of physical actions... Read More →

Authors
MJ

Murphy, Jim

Victoria University of Wellington|Wellington||New Zealand
avatar for Serafin, Stefania

Serafin, Stefania

Aalborg University Copenhagen
avatar for Anders-Petter Andersson

Anders-Petter Andersson

Researcher/Postdoc, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design/Kristianstad University
Anders-Petter Andersson is a researcher in the RHYME.no project at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design, funded by the Norwegian Research Council (2011-2016). He is a postdoctoral researcher in Interactive Music Technology for Health at Kristianstad University in Sweden. He is a sound designer and musicologist. In his PhD thesis “Interactive Music Composition” at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, he discusses how one can compose... Read More →
PB

Preston Beebe

Preston Beebe (United States, born 1988) | | Montréal based composer and percussionist, Preston Beebe uses electronics and technology for both performance and composition. He develops interfaces for visual feedback to aid in live-electronic performances and is a co-developer of the SpectraSurface, a digital percussion interface which uses audio feature extractions to control sound synthesis. He holds a Masters in composition from McGill... Read More →
MB

Magnus Bugge

Producer, Norwegian Centre for Technology in Music in
NC

Nick Collins

Nick Collins is Reader in Composition at Durham University. His research interests include live computer music, musical artificial intelligence, and computational musicology, and he is a frequent international performer as composer-programmer-pianist, from algoraves to electronic chamber music. His latest book, co-written with Scott Wilson and Margaret Schedel, is Electronic Music (Cambridge University Press Introductions series, 2013). ... Read More →
PF

Paulo Ferreira-Lopes

Assistant Professor, School of Arts
avatar for Masataka Goto

Masataka Goto

Prime Senior Researcher, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)
Dr. Masataka Goto is a Prime Senior Researcher and the Leader of the Media Interaction Group at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. In 1992 he was one of the first to start work on automatic music understanding, and has since been at the forefront of research in music technologies and music interfaces based on those technologies. Over the past 23 years, he has published more than 200 papers in... Read More →
ZH

Zachary Hale

CIRMMT, McGill University
Zachary Hale is a Florida-born, Montreal-based composer and percussionist who creates and performs music that deals with live-electronics and new interfaces. His interest lies in the possibilities when the performer and technician are one in the same, and also bridging the gap between musicians and technology. He holds a Bachelor of Music in Percussion, Composition and Electronic Music from the University of South Florida and a Master of Music in... Read More →
IH

Ian Hattwick

Ian Hattwick (Instrument Design) is a composer, performer, and digital musical instrument designer. His current research focuses on collaborative approaches to music performance using gestural interfaces. In 2013 he co-created the Prosthetic Instruments, family of gestural controllers in- tended to be worn by dancers, for which he composed and presented two compositions at the Cacoyannis Institute in Athens, Greece. He holds an MFA from the... Read More →
MK

Martin Kaltenbrunner

Professor, Kunstuniversität Linz
Martin Kaltenbrunner is Professor at the Interface Culture Lab at the | University of Art and Design in Linz. Before his return to Austria he | worked as researcher at the Music Technology Group and lecturer at the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona. As co-founder of Reactable Systems he had been mainly working on the interaction design concepts behind the Reactable - a tangible modular synthesizer that has since been staged by several... Read More →
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts
AV

Adinda van 't Klooster

Director, Art and Media
Dr. Adinda van ‘t Klooster is an artist who works with drawing, sound, light, animation, sculpture and interactive technology. Her work has been exhibited, performed and screened in China, the USA, Australia, Spain, the UK, the Netherlands, Slovenia and Norway. During her PhD with CRUMB she explored the area of emotion research, in particular how felt emotion is related to physiology and how different mapping strategies can be devised when... Read More →
avatar for Sang Won Lee

Sang Won Lee

PhD Candidate., University of Michigan|Ann Arbor|Michigan|United States
PL

Philippe Leroux

Philippe Leroux was born in Boulogne Billancourt (France) on september 24th, 1959. In 1978 he entered the Paris Conservatory (Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique), studied with Ivo Malec, Claude Ballif, Pierre Schäeffer and Guy Reibel and obtained three first prizes. Meanwhile, he followed classes with Olivier Messiaen, Franco Donatoni, Betsy Jolas, Jean-Claude Eloy and Iannis Xénakis. In 1993 he was selected to enter the Villa Medicis... Read More →
CM

Clayton Mamedes

Composer and sound artist.
MM

Martin Marier

Martin Marier is a composer and a performer who is mainly interested in live electronic music using new interfaces.  He is the inventor of the sponge, a cushion like musical interface he uses to perform his pieces. The main goal of this approach is to establish a natural link between gesture and sound in electronic music. He aims at improving the interaction with the audience and at making the process of composing more playful. His... Read More →
avatar for Hanspeter Portner

Hanspeter Portner

Open Music Kontrollers
Independent open source hardware designer; interested in expressive, intuitive and improvized composition and novel designs of corresponding music controllers. | | Former computational biologist in the fields of environmental sciences (ecosystem modeling), neurosciences (neuroinformatics) and biochemistry at ETH Zurich.
CR

Charlie Roberts

Charlie Roberts is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the AlloSphere Research Group at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research focuses on human-computer interaction in virtual reality and creative coding environments. He is the primary developer of the creative coding environment Gibber, with which he regularly performs. Charlie is currently funded through a generous fellowship from the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation.
RS

Rodrigo Schramm

Plymouth University
avatar for Notto J.W. Thelle

Notto J.W. Thelle

Daglig leder, Notam
Notto J. W. Thelle er daglig leder i Notam, et ressurs- og kompetansesenter for nyskapende bruk av teknologi i musikk og kunst. Notam betjener i dag først og fremst de profesjonelle miljøene, men har vært involvert i utvikling og formidling av pedagogisk musikkprogramvare for barn siden 90-tallet. | Thelle har mastergrad i musikkvitenskap med musikkteknologi som fordypningsområde. Han har musikerbakgrunn, og har spilt... Read More →
avatar for Shawn Trail

Shawn Trail

Instructor of Music and Sonic Arts, Portland Community College
avatar for Federico Visi

Federico Visi

PhD research fellow, Plymouth University
www.federicovisi.com


Thursday July 3, 2014 15:00 - 16:00
New Academic Building: Room 314

16:00

Dennis Van Tilburg - Musique Parabolique
Musique Parabolique

Armed with parabolic microphone and live sampling system Dennis van Tilburg takes his audience with wireless headphones on an auditory journey. During a walk through the neighbourhood he catches snatches of street scenes and mixes it live to a composition that manipulates reality. The show evokes associations with spy movies and defies the boundaries of privacy in public spaces when unsolicited outsiders become part of the performance. At unexpected moments it makes our experience eerie, surreal or absurdist.



Artists
DV

Dennis van Tilburg

www.dennisvantilburg.nl
 Musician and sound artist Dennis van Tilburg (1975) operates on the border where music disintegrates into chunks and where apparent loose sounds unexpectedly form wonderful music. He is always looking for new techniques to create an idiosyncratic sound palette. For Musique Parabolique Dennis finds inspiration in the ‘musique concrète’ from the forties and fifties of the last century.



Thursday July 3, 2014 16:00 - 16:30
310NXRd 310 New Cross Road

16:15

Break
Thursday July 3, 2014 16:15 - 16:30
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

[SESSION 14] TANGIBLE INTERACTION AND INTERFACES
Session on Tangible Interaction and Interfaces

Session chair: Martin Kaltenbrunner 

Moderators
MK

Martin Kaltenbrunner

Professor, Kunstuniversität Linz
Martin Kaltenbrunner is Professor at the Interface Culture Lab at the | University of Art and Design in Linz. Before his return to Austria he | worked as researcher at the Music Technology Group and lecturer at the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona. As co-founder of Reactable Systems he had been mainly working on the interaction design concepts behind the Reactable - a tangible modular synthesizer that has since been staged by several... Read More →

Thursday July 3, 2014 16:30 - 17:25
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

Tangible Scores: Shaping the Inherent Instrument Score
Tangible Scores: Shaping the Inherent Instrument Score
Enrique Tomás and Martin Kaltenbrunner
Interface Culture Lab - Kunstuniversität Linz, Kunstuniversität Linz

Long Paper

Tangible Scores are a new paradigm for musical instrument design with a physical configuration inspired by graphic scores. In this paper we will focus on the design aspects of this new interface as well as on some of the related technical details. Creating an intuitive, modular and expressive instrument for textural music was the primary driving force. Following these criteria, we literally incorporated a musical score onto the surface of the instrument as a way of continuously controlling several parameters of the sound synthesis. Tangible Scores are played with both hands and they can adopt multiple physical forms. Complex and expressive sound textures can be easily played over a variety of timbres, enabling precise control in a natural manner.

Authors
MK

Martin Kaltenbrunner

Professor, Kunstuniversität Linz
Martin Kaltenbrunner is Professor at the Interface Culture Lab at the | University of Art and Design in Linz. Before his return to Austria he | worked as researcher at the Music Technology Group and lecturer at the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona. As co-founder of Reactable Systems he had been mainly working on the interaction design concepts behind the Reactable - a tangible modular synthesizer that has since been staged by several... Read More →
ET

Enrique Tomas

Lecturer & PhD Candidate, Kunstuniversität Linz
Enrique Tomás (Madrid, 1981) is a sound artist and researcher who dedicates his time to finding new ways of expression and play with sound, art and technology. His work explores the intersection between sound art, computer music, locative media and human-machine interaction. As an individual artist, Tomás’ activity is centered around "ultranoise.es" and focuses on performances and installations with extreme... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 16:30 - 17:26
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

Striso, a compact expressive instrument based on a new isomorphic note layout
Striso, a compact expressive instrument based on a new isomorphic note layout
Piers Titus van der Torren
Independent researcher

Long Paper

The Striso is a new expressive music instrument with an acoustic feel, which is designed to be intuitive to play and playable everywhere. The sound of every note can be precisely controlled using the direction and pressure sensitive buttons, combined with instrument motion like tilting or shaking. It works standalone, with an internal speaker and battery, and is meant as a self contained instrument with its own distinct sound, but can also be connected to a computer to control other synthesizers. The notes are arranged in an easy and systematic way, according to the new DCompose note layout that is also presented in this paper. The DCompose note layout is designed to be compact, ergonomic, easy to learn, and closely bound to the harmonic properties of the notes.


Thursday July 3, 2014 16:30 - 17:27
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

The OWL programmable stage effects pedal: Revising the concept of the on-stage computer for live music performance
The OWL programmable stage effects pedal: Revising the concept of the on-stage computer for live music performance
Thomas Webster, Guillaume LeNost, Martin Klang
lionfish audio, Rebel Technology

Short Paper

This paper introduces the OWL stage effects pedal and aims to present the device within the context of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research. The OWL is a dedicated, programmable audio device designed to provide an alternative to the use of laptop computers for bespoke audio processing on stage for music performance. By creating a software framework that allows the user to program their own code for the hardware in C++, the OWL project makes it possible to use homemade audio processing on stage without the need for a laptop running a computer music environment such as Pure Data or Supercollider. Moving away from the general-purpose computer to a dedicated audio device means that some of the potential problems and technical complexity of performing with a laptop computer onstage can be avoided, allowing the user to focus more of their attention on the musical performance. Within the format of a traditional guitar ‘stomp box’, the OWL aims to integrate seamlessly into a guitarist’s existing pedal board setup, and in this way presents as an example of a ubiquitous and tangible computing device – a programmable computer designed to fit into an existing mode of musical performance whilst being transparent in use.

Authors
TW

Thomas Webster

Technical support / Lecturer in Music Making, University of Bedfordshire


Thursday July 3, 2014 16:30 - 17:28
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

SPINE: A TUI Toolkit and Physical Computing Hybrid
SPINE: A TUI Toolkit and Physical Computing Hybrid
Aristotelis Hadjakos and Simon Waloschek
Center of Music and Film Informatics, HfM Detmold

Short Paper

Physical computing platforms such as the Arduino have significantly simplified developing physical musical interfaces. However, those platforms typically target everyday programmers rather than composers and media artists. On the other hand, tangible user interface (TUI) toolkits, which provide an integrated, easy-to-use solution have not gained momentum in modern music creation. We propose a concept that hybridizes physical computing and TUI toolkit approaches. This helps to tackle typical TUI toolkit weaknesses, namely quick sensor obsolescence and limited choices. We developed a physical realization based on the idea of "universal pins," which can be configured to perform a variety of duties, making it possible to connect different sensor breakouts and modules. We evaluated our prototype by making performance measurements and conducting a user study demonstrating the feasibility of our approach.


Thursday July 3, 2014 16:30 - 17:29
New Academic Building: LG02

16:30

Andante: Walking Figures on the Piano Keyboard to Visualize Musical Motion
Andante: Walking Figures on the Piano Keyboard to Visualize Musical Motion
Xiao Xiao, Basheer Tome, Hiroshi Ishii
MIT Media Lab

Short Paper

We present Andante, a representation of music as animated characters walking along the piano keyboard that appear to play the physical keys with each step. Based on a view of music pedagogy that emphasizes expressive, full-body communication early in the learning process, Andante promotes an understanding of the music rooted in the body, taking advantage of walking as one of the most fundamental human rhythms. We describe three example visualizations on a preliminary prototype as well as applications extending our examples for practice feedback, improvisation and com- position. Through our project, we reflect on some high level considerations for the NIME community.

Authors
HI

Hiroshi Ishii

Associate Director, MIT Media Lab
Where the sea meets the land, life has blossomed into a myriad of unique forms in the turbulence of water, sand, and wind. At another seashore between the land of atoms and the sea of bits, we are now facing the challenge of reconciling our dual citizenships in the physical and digital worlds. Windows to the digital world are confined to flat square screens and pixels, or "painted bits." Unfortunately, one can not feel and confirm the virtual... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 16:30 - 17:30
New Academic Building: LG02

17:30

NIME Town Meeting
The NIME Town Meeting - a good opportunity to give feedback and to find out the destination for NIME 2015!

Thursday July 3, 2014 17:30 - 18:00
New Academic Building: LG02

18:00

[Concentrated NIME]
Pianistic experiments, including legendary performer John Tilbury duetting with Palle Dahlstedt, crowd interaction – literally throwing the music around – and virtuosic tablet music make for a concert dedicated to how humans and software can co-create.

In A State
Nick Collins and Adinda van 't Klooster

Tangible Scores
Enrique Tomas

Foldings
Palle Dahlstedt and John Tilbury

Thenoscope
Thor Magnusson and Adriana Sa

Contact
Ollie Bown, Dagmar Reinhardt, Lian Loke, Sam Ferguson and Alex Jung

 

Thursday July 3, 2014 18:00 - 19:30
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:01

Nick Collins and Adinda van't Klooster - In a State
In A State

In A State plays with models of emotion: the discrete model (angry, happy, sad, tender in this case) and the continuous model by Russell based on a two-dimensional arousal-valence plane. A pianist improvises, and the emotion perceived in the music by the computer is visualised in an abstract way using digitized drawings and Processing code. The computer’s analysis of emotions also informs electroacoustic responses.  Detected emotional state of both the pianist and the electroacoustic agent are projected and in turn inspire the pianist’s decisions.
Mediation by computer models of emotion forms an ironic core within this performance: flaws in the emotional detection system bring emotion models to the forefront of audience involvement with the work.   



Artists
AV

Adinda van 't Klooster

Director, Art and Media
Dr. Adinda van ‘t Klooster is an artist who works with drawing, sound, light, animation, sculpture and interactive technology. Her work has been exhibited, performed and screened in China, the USA, Australia, Spain, the UK, the Netherlands, Slovenia and Norway. During her PhD with CRUMB she explored the area of emotion research, in particular how felt emotion is related to physiology and how different mapping strategies can be devised when... Read More →
NC

Nick Collins

Nick Collins is Reader in Composition at Durham University. His research interests include live computer music, musical artificial intelligence, and computational musicology, and he is a frequent international performer as composer-programmer-pianist, from algoraves to electronic chamber music. His latest book, co-written with Scott Wilson and Margaret Schedel, is Electronic Music (Cambridge University Press Introductions series, 2013). ... Read More →



Thursday July 3, 2014 18:01 - 18:20
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:20

Enrique Tomas - Tangible Scores
Tangible Scores

A “Tangible Score” is a tactile interface for musical expression that incorporates a score in its physical shape, surface structure or spatial configuration. Using sound as a continuous input signal, both synthesis and control are available simultaneously through direct manipulation on the engraved patterns of the physical score. Sound is generated through a polyphonic concatenative synthesis driven by a real- time analysis and classification of input signal spectra. Each of the scores is loaded with a specific sound corpus that defines its sonic identity. Thus, “Tangible Score” provides a implicit visual and haptic feedback in addition to its sonic core functionality, making it intuitive and learnable but as well suitable as an interface for musical improvisation and sonic exploration.


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***


Artists
ET

Enrique Tomas

Lecturer & PhD Candidate, Kunstuniversität Linz
Enrique Tomás (Madrid, 1981) is a sound artist and researcher who dedicates his time to finding new ways of expression and play with sound, art and technology. His work explores the intersection between sound art, computer music, locative media and human-machine interaction. As an individual artist, Tomás’ activity is centered around "ultranoise.es" and focuses on performances and installations with extreme... Read More →



Thursday July 3, 2014 18:20 - 18:30
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:35

Palle Dahlstedt and John Tilbury - Foldings
Foldings

Two pianists improvise on augmented hybrid grand pianos, in a synergy between acoustic and virtual resonating bodies. Sound processing is  controlled from keyboard alone, with no external controllers, presets or timeline mechanisms.



Artists
JT

John Tilbury

John Tilbury (b. 1936) is an internationally celebrated interpreter of  contemporary piano music. He is also well known as an improvising  musician most notably through his membership of AMM, one of the mos distinguished and influential free improvisation groups to have emerged in  the sixties and which continues to this day.
PD

Palle Dahlstedt

Palle Dahlstedt (b.1971), Swedish improviser, researcher, and composer of  everything from chamber and orchestral music to interactive and  autonomous computer pieces, receiving the Gaudeamus Music Prize in 2001. |  



Thursday July 3, 2014 18:35 - 18:50
Great Hall Goldsmiths

18:50

Thor Magnusson and Adriana Sa - Fermata
The Threnoscope is an audiovisual compositional system focussing on a few key elements: drones, microtonality and spatial sound. The piece aims to remove linear time from the music by emphasising stasis or circularity. Through visual representations of harmonic relationships, tuning systems and drone states, and multichannel audio, the system affords specific compositional focus that encourages the performer to work with spatial sound and descriptions of harmonic spectra. 

In the Fermata piece, the Threnoscope is used together with acoustic instruments for improvising in the microtonal space. Adriana Sa will perform her custom zither, a multi-string instrument with a fretboard and a personal tuning system. The bow enables her to create a wealth of microtonal variations.

Artists
TM

Thor Magnusson

Thor Magnusson's background in philosophy and electronic music informs prolific work in performance, research and teaching. His work focuses on the impact digital technologies have on musical creativity and practice, explored through software development, composition and performance. Thor's research is underpinned by the philosophy of technology and cognitive science, exploring issues of embodiment and compositional constraints in digital musical... Read More →



Thursday July 3, 2014 18:50 - 19:15
Great Hall Goldsmiths

19:15

Ollie Bown, Lian Loke, Dagmar Reinhardt, Sam Ferguson - Contact
Contact

In this work, the categories of performance device, loudspeaker system and compositional structure are jumbled and merged: the members of the audience are invited to be a part of the piece, and find themselves holding in their hands the loudspeaker system itself, which they can interact with via physical and digital affordances. A population of 10 ‘sound balls’ is distributed amongst the performance space. Each ball contains a small WiFi-enabled computer, with loudspeaker and sensors (accelerometer and gyroscope). The balls can be ‘live coded’ from a host computer, running synchronised realtime generative audio software that incorporates the sensors’ activity into the sonic behaviour. They are fully portable and interactive, and are encased in generatively designed, digitally fabricated shells by architects reinhardt_jung.

The piece provides a tactile-acoustic experience that renders musical performance in a way that directly involves the acoustic properties of the delivery system. The small speakers are far from high-definition, but the music is composed with their resonant qualities in mind and the distributed sound produces a rich sonic effect. The composition can also utilise the vibrotactile potential of the speakers through contact with the body, and interactive gestures such as rolling or throwing can be used to produce further sonic effects such as Doppler shift. Such affordances allow the work to extend game-based approaches to composition and performance, such as the work of artists like The Hub, Nick Didkovsky, Jon Rose  and John Zorn. As with Jon Rose’s experimental works, this involves the audience in the gameplay.
Created by Ollie Bown (concept, composition, audio programming), with Dagmar Reinhardt (physical design) and Lian Loke (game/interaction design, choreography). The work has received additional support from Sam Ferguson (network programming, sensor programming) and Alex Jung (physical design).

Artists
DR

Dagmar Reinhardt

Dagmar Reinhardt leads the Master of Digital Architecture Research at the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, The University of Sydney. She is also an architect and practice director of reinhardtjung (www.reinhardtjung.de), a research-led, international design and architecture practice based in Sydney and Frankfurt. Dagmar lectures at European and Australian Universities on research, design, industry collaborations and architecture... Read More →
avatar for Lian Loke

Lian Loke

Lian Loke pursues an interdisciplinary creative practice across performance, installation and technology, with the body as a constant theme. She is a Senior Lecturer in the Design Lab, Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Sydney, and co-founder of the Pork Collective, a group of artists working in performance installation in festival environments. Recent projects investigating creative agency and bodily experience in... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →



Thursday July 3, 2014 19:15 - 19:30
Great Hall Goldsmiths

21:00

[Algorave NIME]
The Algorave ‘movement’ has been gathering pace over the past few years, and has emerged as a novel and compelling way to present live laptop music. For our closing party, we present a range of algorave live coders and instrument builders working with varied interfaces, from iPads to plants and petri dishes. This event is in one of London’s finest club spaces, which boasts a glorious Funktion One soundsystem which feels like a bass rollercoaster.


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***


LIVE:

Canute
Renick Bell
Casper Electronics
FIRE
Charlie Roberts
Leslie Garcia

 

Thursday July 3, 2014 21:00 - Friday July 4, 2014 01:59
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle

21:30

FIRE - Fire Engine
FIRE ENGINE

“FIRE Engine” is an improvisational laptop performance for interactive iPads and Laptop by FIRE (all-Female Interface Research Ensemble). FIRE performs and produces multi-genre, improvisational works on laptops, informed by live-coding, gestural interfaces, and various DAWs.

FIRE is a laptop ensemble designed specifically as a research group for exploratory cognitive, stylistic, and interface research, through performance. FIRE is Norah Lorway, Edie Pearce and Brenna Cantwel, all postgraduate students at the University of Birmingham, studying electroacoustic/computer music, all active SuperCollider programmers, as well as members of BEAST (Birmingham Electroacoustic Sound Theatre).


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***
 

Artists
BC

Brenna Cantwell

Brenna Cantwell (b.1989) is an M.A. student in Electroacoustic Composition at the University of Birmingham, specializing in extended voice techniques and electronic composition for voice. Her current research explores 'liveness' in electronic music through interface-mediated performances that feature body movement as a means of translating virtual information in an expressively relevant way. Her professional pursuits include designing sound-based... Read More →
EP

Edie Pearce

Edie Pearce (b. 1991) is a Master’s student at the University of Birmingham studying Electroacoustic Composition. She is an electroacoustic composer, and an avid SuperCollider programmer. She composes instrumental and electroacoustic music and also has works that combine the two along with visual elements and has had compositions work-shopped by the Edinburgh String Quartet. She has experience performing with many different instrumental... Read More →
NL

Norah Lorway

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of British Columbia
Norah is a live coder, composer and computer music researcher who performs at Algoraves and other such events. She has a PhD in Computer Music from University of Birmingham, where she worked on music and software in SuperCollider and performed on the BEAST multichannel system. Since 2011, she has been a founding member of BEER, a live coding networked laptop ensemble based at the University. Currently she is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the... Read More →


Thursday July 3, 2014 21:30 - 22:00
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle

22:00

Leslie Garcia - Pulsu(m) Plantae: Bio-box _ performance
Pulsu(m) Plantae: Bio-box _ performance

Bio-box is an interface that uses the principle of biofeedback to establish an audio communication between different types of living systems (mosses and algae). The bio-box uses microvoltage from gestural responses by interacting with these bodies through physical stimuli such as light, vibration and touch.


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***
 

Artists
LG

Leslie Garcia

Leslie García’s work explores the fusion process between art and technology, using techniques such as the production of virtual tools, development of electronic prototypes, audio production, net art and visual generative codes. She co-founded DreamAddictive electronic media collective and has worked with Media Lab Prado, Eyebeam, Museum of Latin American Arts, LabSurLab2, Hiperorganicos, Mutek_MX, CTM, Transmediale and others.



Thursday July 3, 2014 22:00 - 22:30
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle

22:30

casperelectronics
Free improvisation with hybrid electronic sound and light synthesizer.

Casperelectronics utilizes a high intensity light display, analog oscillators, CMOS logic based math/rhythm circuits and DSP hardware to create experiences which are sensorially captivating and playfully complex. Audiences are taken to an ecstatic state where eyes, ears and bodies work in concert to create a whole body experience.

***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***


Artists
PE

Peter Edwards (casperelectronics)

owner, casperelectronics
Casperelectronics is Peter Edwards, an American instrument builder, artist and musician. He has spent the last decade exploring electrical engineering and hacking in the service of musical instrument design. He is currently studying electro-acoustics at The Royal Conservatory of The Hague and at STEIM in Amsterdam.



Thursday July 3, 2014 22:30 - 23:00
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle

23:00

Canute
Canute

‘I command you, then, not to flow over my land, nor presume to wet the feet and the robe of your lord’ The chronicle of Henry of Huntingdon 1853

Canute is a fresh collaboration for electronic drum set and live code, exploring the blending of live instrumental playing and functionally manipulable symbols.


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***


Artists
AM

Alex McLean

I am a research fellow and deputy director of ICSRiM (the Interdisciplinary Centre for Scientific Research in Music) in Leeds. http://yaxu.org/
MY

Matthew Yee-King

Matthew Yee­King is a postdoctoral research fellow at Goldsmiths College, where he is working on a project to develop a social network for music learners. Also he is a computer music composer, performer and researcher. He has worked in a range musics from the use of agent based live improvisers through more straight ahead electronic music to free improv with jazz players. He has performed live internationally and nationally as well as... Read More →



Thursday July 3, 2014 23:00 - 23:30
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle

23:30

Charlie Roberts - Some Gibberish
Some Gibberish

In this performance Roberts live codes audio and visuals in the creative coding environment Gibber. The performance capitalizes on new affordances in Gibber enabling cross-modal, time-continuous mappings with a simple notation that lends itself to rapid experimentation and iteration.


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***
 

Artists
CR

Charlie Roberts

Charlie Roberts is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the AlloSphere Research Group at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research focuses on human-computer interaction in virtual reality and creative coding environments. He is the primary developer of the creative coding environment Gibber, with which he regularly performs. Charlie is currently funded through a generous fellowship from the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation.



Thursday July 3, 2014 23:30 - Friday July 4, 2014 00:00
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle

00:00

Renick Bell - Algorave Set
Algorave set

This performance of improvised programming generates danceable percussive music emphasizing generative rhythms and their variations. The stream of rapidly changing algorithmic bass music leads to a stimulated and dancing audience.


Renick Bell is a doctoral student at Tama Art University in Tokyo, Japan. His current re- search interests are live coding, improvisation, and algorithmic composition using open source software. He is the author of Conductive, a library for live coding in the Haskell programming language. Previously, he was a doctoral student at Tokyo Denki University. He has a masters degree in music technology from Indiana University and an interdisci- plinary bachelors degree from Texas Tech University. He has performed in Australia, Aus- tria, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, and the United States. He is from West Texas but has lived in Tokyo since 2006. 


***PLEASE NOTE: COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DELEGATES OF NIME CONFERENCE***



Friday July 4, 2014 00:00 - 00:30
Corsica Studios Elephant and Castle
 
Friday, July 4
 

09:00

[OPEN DAY]
The Open Day is an additional day to the conference programme beyond the core technical programme and is open to all registered delegates as well members of the general public free of charge. We hope with the Open Day to showcase NIME research to broader communities and industries, and in return, to feed back into the NIME community it self, late breaking developments in scholarly work, grassroots Do-It-Yourself activities, and the musical press.

Friday July 4, 2014 09:00 - 21:00
Great Hall Goldsmiths

10:00

Gender, Education, Creativity in Digital Music and Sound Art
Gender, Education, Creativity in Digital Music and Sound Art
Georgina Born, Kyle Devine, Sally-Jane Norman and Mark Taylor
University of Oxford, University of Sussex, University of Manchester

This panel broadly examines issues of gender in relation to both higher education and creative practices in the fields of electronic and computer music and sound art. The enormous growth of music technology degree provision in British Higher Education since the mid 1990s has been accompanied by a clear demographic bifurcation between music technology and traditional music degrees. Our goal is to set these research findings into dialogue with panelists and discussants concerned with issues of gender in relation to creative processes in terms of technological design and use as well as performance, installation and compositional practices. The workshop will therefore offer a basis on which to reflect on questions of gender within the NIME community and beyond.

Panelists include, in addition to the organisers,
Freida Abtan, Goldsmiths, University of London
Holly Ingleton, City University London
Cathy Lane, CRiSAP, University of the Arts, London
John Richards, De Montfort University
Laetitia Sonami, sound artist
Marie Thompson, Newcastle University
Simon Waters, Queen’s University Belfast


Organised by the MusDig project, http://musdig.music.ox.ac.uk/musdig-nime-2014/

Authors
KD

Kyle Devine

Lecturer in Music, City University London


Friday July 4, 2014 10:00 - 13:00
Cinema Space Goldsmiths

10:00

Hackathon
We are excited to announce a one day Hackathon hosted by Music Hackspace. Themed around assistive and adaptable musical interfaces for less abled players, the Hackathon will feature challenges presented by Heart n Soul and Drake Music. During the Hackathon there will also be talks, demos & performances by developers and music technologists on-stage. To reserve you place and for more information on the Hack-a-Thon challenges, please visit: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/nime2014-open-day-hackathon-tickets-11977857093

Friday July 4, 2014 10:00 - 21:00
Great Hall Goldsmiths

14:00

Q&A panel session with Atau Tanaka and Tony Herrington
Tony Herrington, Editor-in-Chief of The Wire magazine, and Atau Tanaka, NIME general co-chair with Rebecca Fiebrink, will hold a follow up conversation to a discussion started in January for the Made in Goldsmiths series. They will hold an informal discussion with a chance for audience questions.

Authors
TH

Tony Herrington

Tony Herrington is editor-in-chief and publisher of The Wire magazine.
AT

Atau Tanaka

Atau Tanaka studied Physical Sciences at Harvard and has a doctorate in Computer Music Composition from Stanford University’s CCRMA. He was awarded the Prix de Paris to conduct research in Paris at IRCAM, Centre Pompidou. His first inspirations came upon meeting John Cage during his Norton Lectures and would go to on re-create Cage’s Variations VII with Matt Wand and :zoviet*france:. In the 90’s he formed Sensorband with Zbigniew... Read More →


Friday July 4, 2014 14:00 - 15:00
Cinema Space Goldsmiths

14:00

Technology Café
The mission of the Technology Café is to open channels of communication between the NIME attendees, the public at large, and companies manufacturing musical interfaces, instruments and software. This will represent an excellent recruitment opportunity for studends and young researchers interested in jobs in industry. Confirmed comapnies who will exhibit  products and presentations include  Seaboard, Alpha Sphere, IK Multimedia, Mogees, Hoxton OWL / Music Hackspace, IRCAM, Native Instruments, Warp Records, FXpansion, Tim Exile, Yuli Levtov, Patchblocks, Create Digital Music, Oscilla.

Friday July 4, 2014 14:00 - 18:00
Great Hall Goldsmiths

15:00

Moco Panel discussion on Movement and Computing
MOCO@NIME14: Movement and Computing meets Musical Interactions
Frédéric Bevilacqua, Sarah Fdili Alaoui, Jules Françoise, Philippe Pasquier and Thecla Schiphorst
IRCAM CNRS UMR STMS UPMC, Paris, France; Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada

The Moco panel bridges interdisciplinary communities in movement, computing, music and interaction. We will present the outcomes of a workshop called MOCO2014 (Movement and Computing) premiering at Ircam in Paris in June 2014. Although the primary target of MOCO is movement and computing, we address a community that overlaps with the NIME community, sharing topics on expressivity, embodied interaction, interactive machine learning, compositional modeling and generative systems to name a few. We are interested in creating a dialogue between researchers and artists involved in these communities, as well as the larger community interested in the intersection between arts, science and technology. The panel will include contributors to MOCO alongside researchers and artists in the NIME community that explore the space between sound and movement. Our goal is to share research concepts and to develop future relationships that will be beneficial to both communities.  Friday 4th July from 3-6pm, Goldsmiths Cinema

Authors
avatar for Sarah Fdili Alaoui

Sarah Fdili Alaoui

University, SIAT
http://saralaoui.com/
avatar for Jules Françoise

Jules Françoise

Postdoctoral Researcher, Ircam
avatar for Philippe Pasquier

Philippe Pasquier

ISEA2015 Symposium Director, Associate Professor, Scool of Interactive Arts + Technology
Dr. Philippe Pasquier is Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology. He is both a recognized scientist and a multi-disciplinary artist. His contributions range from theoretical research in artificial intelligence, multi-agent systems and machine learning to applied artistic research and practice in digital art, computer music, and generative art. Philippe is the Chair and investigator of the AAAI... Read More →
avatar for Thecla Schiphorst

Thecla Schiphorst

Professor, SFU
Dr. Thecla Schiphorst is Associate Director and Associate Professor in the School of Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. Her background in dance and computing form the basis for her research in embodied interaction, focusing on movement knowledge representation, tangible and wearable technologies, media and digital art, and the aesthetics of interaction. Her research goal is to expand the practical... Read More →


Friday July 4, 2014 15:00 - 18:00
Cinema Space Goldsmiths

15:00

The NIME2014 UnConfererence
The UnConference will take place during a special open day of activities on July 4th. 3pm-6pm in Richard Hoggart Building (RHB) rooms 309, 307, and 2.107.
The UnConference is an informal gathering of artists, thinkers, dreamers, and other troublemakers all focused on digital technologies, electronic arts, and new interfaces for musical expression. Participants will have the opportunity to share their work with peers in an informal setting.  Composers, artists, and technologists are invited to bring both finished
work and work in progress for critique. Suggest a workshop or present your ideas! The UnConference will serve as a place for discussion of emerging topics at NIME.

To present in the UnConference, please submit a 1-page abstract of your topic that can appear on the website of the New Interfaces for Musical Expression Conference. If you require any technical assistance other than the use of a projector and speaker system, please also include a detailed technical description of your needs. An OpenJack concert will follow the UnConference​ sessions, in which can be featured performances.
All submissions must be sent electronically to nime2014unconference@goldsmithsdigital.com by June 10th 2014.

Participants at the UnConference will not be required to register for the New Interfaces for Musical Expression Conference unless they wish to attend the NIME papers and events from July 1-4.

Friday July 4, 2014 15:00 - 18:00
Richard Hoggart Building: RHB 309, 307, and 2.107

19:00

Open Jack
New NIME’s are presented at the NIME conference but what becomes of them afterwards? The aim of the Open Jack is to put different NIME’s together in a session to show how they function in an improvisational setting that is not too prepared. In this session we combine NIME instruments with some traditional instruments and live electronics. The pool of participants in the Open Jack will form different formations, based on their own preferences, in which they will play a number of improvisations. In order to guarantee the quality and purpose of the evening we expect the participating musicians to:


  • be experienced (group) improvisors that are versatile in a number of styles.

  • use live electronics as an integral and expressive part of the instrument or to have good command of extended techniques on an acoustic instrument that makes blending with live electronics a natural musical action.

  • bring NIME instruments that they actually play if they can lay their hands on them.

  • have a flexible personality…


If you want to be part of the Open Jack you can send an email to Hans Leeuw: hans@electrumpet.nl
Hans Leeuw, Pierre Alexandre Tremblay and Palle Dahlstedt will form the backbone for this session.

Friday July 4, 2014 19:00 - 20:30
Richard Hoggart Building: great hall